Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The effect of dual task and executive training on pattern of gait in older adults with balance impairment: A Randomized controlled trial.
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2016 Jan-Feb; 62:83-9.AG

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of two different approaches of dual-task training and executive training on pattern of gait in older adults with balance impairment.

METHODS

Thirty older adults with the mean age of 73.8 participated in the study. They scored 52 or less on the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), and walked with a self-selected gait speed of 1.1m/s or less. Participants were randomly assigned to one of the three groups: experimental group one (cognitive dual-task (CDT) training) that focused on gait performance under dual task condition; experimental group two (executive function (EF) training) who underwent 3 types of training on working memory, inhibition, speed of processing; and a control group. Subjects walked 10 m, under single-task and dual-task (DT) conditions where kinematics parameters were recorded. Participants in experimental groups received 45-min training sessions, 3 times a week for 8 weeks. The data obtained was analyzed using repeated measure at a criterion p-value of 0.05.

RESULTS

The results showed that after training, changes of walking speed, length of stride and step, times of stride, step, single support, and double support, were significant at p<0.05. Asymmetry index in walking with dual task condition increased significantly, but after training asymmetry in DT condition decreased significantly in EF group.

CONCLUSIONS

Both training groups showed improvements in gait parameters in the post test compared with that in the control group; however, in EF training group, symmetry of limbs and inter-coordination, improved more than that in CDT group.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Motor Behavior, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad-International Campus, Mashhad, Iran.Department of Motor Behavior, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran. Electronic address: hamidtaheri@um.ac.ir.Department of Motor Behavior, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran. Electronic address: askakhki@ferdowsi.um.ac.ir.Department of Sport Biomechanics, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Bu Ali Sina University, Hamedan, Iran.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26508098

Citation

Azadian, Elaheh, et al. "The Effect of Dual Task and Executive Training On Pattern of Gait in Older Adults With Balance Impairment: a Randomized Controlled Trial." Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, vol. 62, 2016, pp. 83-9.
Azadian E, Torbati HR, Kakhki AR, et al. The effect of dual task and executive training on pattern of gait in older adults with balance impairment: A Randomized controlled trial. Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2016;62:83-9.
Azadian, E., Torbati, H. R., Kakhki, A. R., & Farahpour, N. (2016). The effect of dual task and executive training on pattern of gait in older adults with balance impairment: A Randomized controlled trial. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 62, 83-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2015.10.001
Azadian E, et al. The Effect of Dual Task and Executive Training On Pattern of Gait in Older Adults With Balance Impairment: a Randomized Controlled Trial. Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2016 Jan-Feb;62:83-9. PubMed PMID: 26508098.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effect of dual task and executive training on pattern of gait in older adults with balance impairment: A Randomized controlled trial. AU - Azadian,Elaheh, AU - Torbati,Hamid Reza Taheri, AU - Kakhki,Ali Reza Saberi, AU - Farahpour,Nader, Y1 - 2015/10/23/ PY - 2015/06/30/received PY - 2015/10/01/revised PY - 2015/10/05/accepted PY - 2015/10/29/entrez PY - 2015/10/29/pubmed PY - 2016/4/8/medline KW - Asymmetry KW - Dual task training KW - Executive function training KW - Gait kinematic SP - 83 EP - 9 JF - Archives of gerontology and geriatrics JO - Arch Gerontol Geriatr VL - 62 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of two different approaches of dual-task training and executive training on pattern of gait in older adults with balance impairment. METHODS: Thirty older adults with the mean age of 73.8 participated in the study. They scored 52 or less on the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), and walked with a self-selected gait speed of 1.1m/s or less. Participants were randomly assigned to one of the three groups: experimental group one (cognitive dual-task (CDT) training) that focused on gait performance under dual task condition; experimental group two (executive function (EF) training) who underwent 3 types of training on working memory, inhibition, speed of processing; and a control group. Subjects walked 10 m, under single-task and dual-task (DT) conditions where kinematics parameters were recorded. Participants in experimental groups received 45-min training sessions, 3 times a week for 8 weeks. The data obtained was analyzed using repeated measure at a criterion p-value of 0.05. RESULTS: The results showed that after training, changes of walking speed, length of stride and step, times of stride, step, single support, and double support, were significant at p<0.05. Asymmetry index in walking with dual task condition increased significantly, but after training asymmetry in DT condition decreased significantly in EF group. CONCLUSIONS: Both training groups showed improvements in gait parameters in the post test compared with that in the control group; however, in EF training group, symmetry of limbs and inter-coordination, improved more than that in CDT group. SN - 1872-6976 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26508098/The_effect_of_dual_task_and_executive_training_on_pattern_of_gait_in_older_adults_with_balance_impairment:_A_Randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167-4943(15)30065-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -