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Breast cancer statistics, 2015: Convergence of incidence rates between black and white women.
CA Cancer J Clin 2016 Jan-Feb; 66(1):31-42CC

Abstract

In this article, the American Cancer Society provides an overview of female breast cancer statistics in the United States, including data on incidence, mortality, survival, and screening. Approximately 231,840 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 40,290 breast cancer deaths are expected to occur among US women in 2015. Breast cancer incidence rates increased among non-Hispanic black (black) and Asian/Pacific Islander women and were stable among non-Hispanic white (white), Hispanic, and American Indian/Alaska Native women from 2008 to 2012. Although white women have historically had higher incidence rates than black women, in 2012, the rates converged. Notably, during 2008 through 2012, incidence rates were significantly higher in black women compared with white women in 7 states, primarily located in the South. From 1989 to 2012, breast cancer death rates decreased by 36%, which translates to 249,000 breast cancer deaths averted in the United States over this period. This decrease in death rates was evident in all racial/ethnic groups except American Indians/Alaska Natives. However, the mortality disparity between black and white women nationwide has continued to widen; and, by 2012, death rates were 42% higher in black women than in white women. During 2003 through 2012, breast cancer death rates declined for white women in all 50 states; but, for black women, declines occurred in 27 of 30 states that had sufficient data to analyze trends. In 3 states (Mississippi, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin), breast cancer death rates in black women were stable during 2003 through 2012. Widening racial disparities in breast cancer mortality are likely to continue, at least in the short term, in view of the increasing trends in breast cancer incidence rates in black women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Senior Epidemiologist, Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.Director, Risk Factor Screening and Surveillance, Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.Epidemiologist, Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.Assistant Professor of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA.Vice President, Cancer Screening, Cancer Control Department, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.Vice President, Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26513636

Citation

DeSantis, Carol E., et al. "Breast Cancer Statistics, 2015: Convergence of Incidence Rates Between Black and White Women." CA: a Cancer Journal for Clinicians, vol. 66, no. 1, 2016, pp. 31-42.
DeSantis CE, Fedewa SA, Goding Sauer A, et al. Breast cancer statistics, 2015: Convergence of incidence rates between black and white women. CA Cancer J Clin. 2016;66(1):31-42.
DeSantis, C. E., Fedewa, S. A., Goding Sauer, A., Kramer, J. L., Smith, R. A., & Jemal, A. (2016). Breast cancer statistics, 2015: Convergence of incidence rates between black and white women. CA: a Cancer Journal for Clinicians, 66(1), pp. 31-42. doi:10.3322/caac.21320.
DeSantis CE, et al. Breast Cancer Statistics, 2015: Convergence of Incidence Rates Between Black and White Women. CA Cancer J Clin. 2016;66(1):31-42. PubMed PMID: 26513636.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Breast cancer statistics, 2015: Convergence of incidence rates between black and white women. AU - DeSantis,Carol E, AU - Fedewa,Stacey A, AU - Goding Sauer,Ann, AU - Kramer,Joan L, AU - Smith,Robert A, AU - Jemal,Ahmedin, Y1 - 2015/10/29/ PY - 2015/08/21/received PY - 2015/08/21/accepted PY - 2015/10/30/entrez PY - 2015/10/30/pubmed PY - 2016/5/26/medline KW - breast neoplasms KW - epidemiology KW - screening and early detection SP - 31 EP - 42 JF - CA: a cancer journal for clinicians JO - CA Cancer J Clin VL - 66 IS - 1 N2 - In this article, the American Cancer Society provides an overview of female breast cancer statistics in the United States, including data on incidence, mortality, survival, and screening. Approximately 231,840 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 40,290 breast cancer deaths are expected to occur among US women in 2015. Breast cancer incidence rates increased among non-Hispanic black (black) and Asian/Pacific Islander women and were stable among non-Hispanic white (white), Hispanic, and American Indian/Alaska Native women from 2008 to 2012. Although white women have historically had higher incidence rates than black women, in 2012, the rates converged. Notably, during 2008 through 2012, incidence rates were significantly higher in black women compared with white women in 7 states, primarily located in the South. From 1989 to 2012, breast cancer death rates decreased by 36%, which translates to 249,000 breast cancer deaths averted in the United States over this period. This decrease in death rates was evident in all racial/ethnic groups except American Indians/Alaska Natives. However, the mortality disparity between black and white women nationwide has continued to widen; and, by 2012, death rates were 42% higher in black women than in white women. During 2003 through 2012, breast cancer death rates declined for white women in all 50 states; but, for black women, declines occurred in 27 of 30 states that had sufficient data to analyze trends. In 3 states (Mississippi, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin), breast cancer death rates in black women were stable during 2003 through 2012. Widening racial disparities in breast cancer mortality are likely to continue, at least in the short term, in view of the increasing trends in breast cancer incidence rates in black women. SN - 1542-4863 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26513636/Breast_cancer_statistics_2015:_Convergence_of_incidence_rates_between_black_and_white_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.3322/caac.21320 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -