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Continuous negative pressure in the treatment of infants with pulmonary hypertension and respiratory failure.
J Perinatol. 1989 Mar; 9(1):43-8.JP

Abstract

We report the successful use of continuous negative pressure (CNP) with standard intermittent mandatory ventilation (IMV) in five patients suffering from respiratory failure and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). These infants all fulfilled criteria for use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) with PaO2 less than 40 torr, alveolar-arterial oxygen difference (AaDO2) greater than 620 mm Hg, and oxygenation index (OI) greater than 50. Despite a considerable amount of conventional ventilation with mean airway pressures (PAW) between 14 and 26 cm water, none of these patients were able to improve oxygenation. All infants demonstrated significant improvement in ventilation requirements after initiation of CNP as reflected by a decrease in PAW, proximal inspiratory pressure (PIP), and IMV. Oxygenation dramatically improved in all infants. All five patients survived without any pulmonary or neurological complications at discharge. Availability of CNP may circumvent the need for ECMO in infants with severe lung disease and PPHN.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Orange.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2651595

Citation

Sills, J H., et al. "Continuous Negative Pressure in the Treatment of Infants With Pulmonary Hypertension and Respiratory Failure." Journal of Perinatology : Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association, vol. 9, no. 1, 1989, pp. 43-8.
Sills JH, Cvetnic WG, Pietz J. Continuous negative pressure in the treatment of infants with pulmonary hypertension and respiratory failure. J Perinatol. 1989;9(1):43-8.
Sills, J. H., Cvetnic, W. G., & Pietz, J. (1989). Continuous negative pressure in the treatment of infants with pulmonary hypertension and respiratory failure. Journal of Perinatology : Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association, 9(1), 43-8.
Sills JH, Cvetnic WG, Pietz J. Continuous Negative Pressure in the Treatment of Infants With Pulmonary Hypertension and Respiratory Failure. J Perinatol. 1989;9(1):43-8. PubMed PMID: 2651595.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Continuous negative pressure in the treatment of infants with pulmonary hypertension and respiratory failure. AU - Sills,J H, AU - Cvetnic,W G, AU - Pietz,J, PY - 1989/3/1/pubmed PY - 1989/3/1/medline PY - 1989/3/1/entrez SP - 43 EP - 8 JF - Journal of perinatology : official journal of the California Perinatal Association JO - J Perinatol VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - We report the successful use of continuous negative pressure (CNP) with standard intermittent mandatory ventilation (IMV) in five patients suffering from respiratory failure and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). These infants all fulfilled criteria for use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) with PaO2 less than 40 torr, alveolar-arterial oxygen difference (AaDO2) greater than 620 mm Hg, and oxygenation index (OI) greater than 50. Despite a considerable amount of conventional ventilation with mean airway pressures (PAW) between 14 and 26 cm water, none of these patients were able to improve oxygenation. All infants demonstrated significant improvement in ventilation requirements after initiation of CNP as reflected by a decrease in PAW, proximal inspiratory pressure (PIP), and IMV. Oxygenation dramatically improved in all infants. All five patients survived without any pulmonary or neurological complications at discharge. Availability of CNP may circumvent the need for ECMO in infants with severe lung disease and PPHN. SN - 0743-8346 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2651595/Continuous_negative_pressure_in_the_treatment_of_infants_with_pulmonary_hypertension_and_respiratory_failure_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -