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Aerobic bacterial profile and antibiotic resistance in patients with diabetic foot infections.
Rev Soc Bras Med Trop. 2015 Sep-Oct; 48(5):546-54.RS

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

This study aimed to determine the frequencies of bacterial isolates cultured from diabetic foot infections and assess their resistance and susceptibility to commonly used antibiotics.

METHODS

This prospective study included 41 patients with diabetic foot lesions. Bacteria were isolated from foot lesions, and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern was determined using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method and/or broth method [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)].

RESULTS

The most common location of ulceration was the toe (54%), followed by the plantar surface (27%) and dorsal portion (19%). A total of 89 bacterial isolates were obtained from 30 patients. The infections were predominantly due to Gram-positive bacteria and polymicrobial bacteremia. The most commonly isolated Gram-positive bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus, followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The most commonly isolated Gram-negative bacteria were Proteus spp. and Enterobacterspp., followed by Escherichia coli, Pseudomonasspp., and Citrobacterspp. Nine cases of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) had cefoxitin resistance, and among these MRSA isolates, 3 were resistant to vancomycin with the MIC technique. The antibiotic imipenem was the most effective against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and gentamicin was effective against Gram-negative bacteria.

CONCLUSIONS

The present study confirmed the high prevalence of multidrug-resistant pathogens in diabetic foot ulcers. It is necessary to evaluate the different microorganisms infecting the wound and to know the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the isolates from the infected wound. This knowledge is crucial for planning treatment with the appropriate antibiotics, reducing resistance patterns, and minimizing healthcare costs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Palmas, Tocantins, Brazil.Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Palmas, Tocantins, Brazil.Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Palmas, Tocantins, Brazil.Setor de Cirurgia Vascular, Hospital Geral de Palmas, Palmas, Tocantins, Brazil.Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Palmas, Tocantins, Brazil.Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Palmas, Tocantins, Brazil.Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Palmas, Tocantins, Brazil.Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Palmas, Tocantins, Brazil.Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Palmas, Tocantins, Brazil.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26516963

Citation

Perim, Michele Cezimbra, et al. "Aerobic Bacterial Profile and Antibiotic Resistance in Patients With Diabetic Foot Infections." Revista Da Sociedade Brasileira De Medicina Tropical, vol. 48, no. 5, 2015, pp. 546-54.
Perim MC, Borges Jda C, Celeste SR, et al. Aerobic bacterial profile and antibiotic resistance in patients with diabetic foot infections. Rev Soc Bras Med Trop. 2015;48(5):546-54.
Perim, M. C., Borges, J. d. a. . C., Celeste, S. R., Orsolin, E. d. e. . F., Mendes, R. R., Mendes, G. O., Ferreira, R. L., Carreiro, S. C., & Pranchevicius, M. C. (2015). Aerobic bacterial profile and antibiotic resistance in patients with diabetic foot infections. Revista Da Sociedade Brasileira De Medicina Tropical, 48(5), 546-54. https://doi.org/10.1590/0037-8682-0146-2015
Perim MC, et al. Aerobic Bacterial Profile and Antibiotic Resistance in Patients With Diabetic Foot Infections. Rev Soc Bras Med Trop. 2015 Sep-Oct;48(5):546-54. PubMed PMID: 26516963.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Aerobic bacterial profile and antibiotic resistance in patients with diabetic foot infections. AU - Perim,Michele Cezimbra, AU - Borges,Joelma da Costa, AU - Celeste,Stela Regina Costa, AU - Orsolin,Ederson de Freitas, AU - Mendes,Rafael Rocha, AU - Mendes,Gabriella Oliveira, AU - Ferreira,Roumayne Lopes, AU - Carreiro,Solange Cristina, AU - Pranchevicius,Maria Cristina da Silva, PY - 2015/05/05/received PY - 2015/08/20/accepted PY - 2015/10/31/entrez PY - 2015/11/1/pubmed PY - 2016/4/12/medline SP - 546 EP - 54 JF - Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical JO - Rev. Soc. Bras. Med. Trop. VL - 48 IS - 5 N2 - INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to determine the frequencies of bacterial isolates cultured from diabetic foot infections and assess their resistance and susceptibility to commonly used antibiotics. METHODS: This prospective study included 41 patients with diabetic foot lesions. Bacteria were isolated from foot lesions, and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern was determined using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method and/or broth method [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)]. RESULTS: The most common location of ulceration was the toe (54%), followed by the plantar surface (27%) and dorsal portion (19%). A total of 89 bacterial isolates were obtained from 30 patients. The infections were predominantly due to Gram-positive bacteria and polymicrobial bacteremia. The most commonly isolated Gram-positive bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus, followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The most commonly isolated Gram-negative bacteria were Proteus spp. and Enterobacterspp., followed by Escherichia coli, Pseudomonasspp., and Citrobacterspp. Nine cases of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) had cefoxitin resistance, and among these MRSA isolates, 3 were resistant to vancomycin with the MIC technique. The antibiotic imipenem was the most effective against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and gentamicin was effective against Gram-negative bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: The present study confirmed the high prevalence of multidrug-resistant pathogens in diabetic foot ulcers. It is necessary to evaluate the different microorganisms infecting the wound and to know the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the isolates from the infected wound. This knowledge is crucial for planning treatment with the appropriate antibiotics, reducing resistance patterns, and minimizing healthcare costs. SN - 1678-9849 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26516963/Aerobic_bacterial_profile_and_antibiotic_resistance_in_patients_with_diabetic_foot_infections_ L2 - http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0037-86822015000500546&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -