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Glutamatergic transmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala is selectively altered in Marchigian Sardinian alcohol-preferring rats: Alcohol and CRF effects.
Neuropharmacology 2016; 102:21-31N

Abstract

The CRF system of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is important for the processing of anxiety, stress, and effects of acute and chronic ethanol. We previously reported that ethanol decreases evoked glutamate transmission in the CeA of Sprague Dawley rats and that ethanol dependence alters glutamate release in the CeA. Here, we examined the effects of ethanol, CRF and a CRF1 receptor antagonist on spontaneous and evoked glutamatergic transmission in CeA neurons from Wistar and Marchigian Sardinian Preferring (msP) rats, a rodent line genetically selected for excessive alcohol drinking and characterized by heightened activity of the CRF1 system. Basal spontaneous and evoked glutamate transmission in CeA neurons from msP rats was increased compared to Wistar rats. Ethanol had divergent effects, either increasing or decreasing spontaneous glutamate release in the CeA of Wistar rats. This bidirectional effect was retained in msP rats, but the magnitude of the ethanol-induced increase in glutamate release was significantly smaller. The inhibitory effect of ethanol on evoked glutamatergic transmission was similar in both strains. CRF also either increased or decreased spontaneous glutamate release in CeA neurons of Wistar rats, however, in msP rats CRF only increased glutamate release. The inhibitory effect of CRF on evoked glutamatergic transmission was also lost in neurons from msP rats. A CRF1 antagonist produced only minor effects on spontaneous glutamate transmission, which were consistent across strains, and no effects on evoked glutamate transmission. These results demonstrate that the genetically altered CRF system of msP rats results in alterations in spontaneous and stimulated glutamate signaling in the CeA that may contribute to both the anxiety and drinking behavioral phenotypes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Committee on the Neurobiology of Addictive Disorders, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA.Committee on the Neurobiology of Addictive Disorders, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA.Committee on the Neurobiology of Addictive Disorders, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA.Committee on the Neurobiology of Addictive Disorders, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA.Committee on the Neurobiology of Addictive Disorders, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA.National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Bldg.10-CRC/Rm. 1-5330, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892-1108, USA.School of Pharmacy, Pharmacology Unit, University of Camerino, Via Madonna delle Carceri, 62032 Camerino, Italy.Committee on the Neurobiology of Addictive Disorders, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA. Electronic address: mroberto@scripps.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26519902

Citation

Herman, Melissa A., et al. "Glutamatergic Transmission in the Central Nucleus of the Amygdala Is Selectively Altered in Marchigian Sardinian Alcohol-preferring Rats: Alcohol and CRF Effects." Neuropharmacology, vol. 102, 2016, pp. 21-31.
Herman MA, Varodayan FP, Oleata CS, et al. Glutamatergic transmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala is selectively altered in Marchigian Sardinian alcohol-preferring rats: Alcohol and CRF effects. Neuropharmacology. 2016;102:21-31.
Herman, M. A., Varodayan, F. P., Oleata, C. S., Luu, G., Kirson, D., Heilig, M., ... Roberto, M. (2016). Glutamatergic transmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala is selectively altered in Marchigian Sardinian alcohol-preferring rats: Alcohol and CRF effects. Neuropharmacology, 102, pp. 21-31. doi:10.1016/j.neuropharm.2015.10.027.
Herman MA, et al. Glutamatergic Transmission in the Central Nucleus of the Amygdala Is Selectively Altered in Marchigian Sardinian Alcohol-preferring Rats: Alcohol and CRF Effects. Neuropharmacology. 2016;102:21-31. PubMed PMID: 26519902.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Glutamatergic transmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala is selectively altered in Marchigian Sardinian alcohol-preferring rats: Alcohol and CRF effects. AU - Herman,Melissa A, AU - Varodayan,Florence P, AU - Oleata,Christopher S, AU - Luu,George, AU - Kirson,Dean, AU - Heilig,Markus, AU - Ciccocioppo,Roberto, AU - Roberto,Marisa, Y1 - 2015/10/28/ PY - 2015/07/24/received PY - 2015/10/22/revised PY - 2015/10/22/accepted PY - 2017/03/01/pmc-release PY - 2015/11/1/entrez PY - 2015/11/1/pubmed PY - 2016/10/8/medline KW - Alcohol KW - Amygdala KW - CRF KW - CRF1 antagonist KW - Electrophysiology KW - Glutamate SP - 21 EP - 31 JF - Neuropharmacology JO - Neuropharmacology VL - 102 N2 - The CRF system of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is important for the processing of anxiety, stress, and effects of acute and chronic ethanol. We previously reported that ethanol decreases evoked glutamate transmission in the CeA of Sprague Dawley rats and that ethanol dependence alters glutamate release in the CeA. Here, we examined the effects of ethanol, CRF and a CRF1 receptor antagonist on spontaneous and evoked glutamatergic transmission in CeA neurons from Wistar and Marchigian Sardinian Preferring (msP) rats, a rodent line genetically selected for excessive alcohol drinking and characterized by heightened activity of the CRF1 system. Basal spontaneous and evoked glutamate transmission in CeA neurons from msP rats was increased compared to Wistar rats. Ethanol had divergent effects, either increasing or decreasing spontaneous glutamate release in the CeA of Wistar rats. This bidirectional effect was retained in msP rats, but the magnitude of the ethanol-induced increase in glutamate release was significantly smaller. The inhibitory effect of ethanol on evoked glutamatergic transmission was similar in both strains. CRF also either increased or decreased spontaneous glutamate release in CeA neurons of Wistar rats, however, in msP rats CRF only increased glutamate release. The inhibitory effect of CRF on evoked glutamatergic transmission was also lost in neurons from msP rats. A CRF1 antagonist produced only minor effects on spontaneous glutamate transmission, which were consistent across strains, and no effects on evoked glutamate transmission. These results demonstrate that the genetically altered CRF system of msP rats results in alterations in spontaneous and stimulated glutamate signaling in the CeA that may contribute to both the anxiety and drinking behavioral phenotypes. SN - 1873-7064 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26519902/Glutamatergic_transmission_in_the_central_nucleus_of_the_amygdala_is_selectively_altered_in_Marchigian_Sardinian_alcohol_preferring_rats:_Alcohol_and_CRF_effects_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0028-3908(15)30150-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -