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US Household Food Shopping Patterns: Dynamic Shifts Since 2000 And Socioeconomic Predictors.
Health Aff (Millwood). 2015 Nov; 34(11):1840-8.HA

Abstract

Under the assumption that differential food access might underlie nutritional disparities, programs and policies have focused on the need to build supermarkets in underserved areas, in an effort to improve dietary quality. However, there is limited evidence about which types of stores are used by households of different income levels and differing races/ethnicities. We used cross-sectional cluster analysis to derive shopping patterns from US households' volume food purchases by store from 2000 to 2012. Multinomial logistic regression identified household socioeconomic characteristics that were associated with shopping patterns in 2012. We found three food shopping patterns or clusters: households that primarily shopped at grocery stores, households that primarily shopped at mass merchandisers, and a combination cluster in which households split their purchases among multiple store types. In 2012 we found no income or race/ethnicity differences for the cluster of households that primarily shopped at grocery stores. However, low-income non-Hispanic blacks (versus non-Hispanic whites) had a significantly lower probability of belonging to the mass merchandise cluster. These varied shopping patterns must be considered in future policy initiatives. Furthermore, it is important to continue studying the complex rationales for people's food shopping patterns.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dalia Stern was a graduate student research assistant in nutrition at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill at the time this study was conducted. She is now a researcher at the National Institute of Public Health of Mexico.Whitney R. Robinson is an assistant professor in epidemiology at the University of North Carolina.Shu Wen Ng is an assistant professor in nutrition at the University of North Carolina.Penny Gordon-Larsen is an associate professor in nutrition at the University of North Carolina.Barry M. Popkin (popkin@unc.edu) is a professor of nutrition at the University of North Carolina.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26526241

Citation

Stern, Dalia, et al. "US Household Food Shopping Patterns: Dynamic Shifts Since 2000 and Socioeconomic Predictors." Health Affairs (Project Hope), vol. 34, no. 11, 2015, pp. 1840-8.
Stern D, Robinson WR, Ng SW, et al. US Household Food Shopping Patterns: Dynamic Shifts Since 2000 And Socioeconomic Predictors. Health Aff (Millwood). 2015;34(11):1840-8.
Stern, D., Robinson, W. R., Ng, S. W., Gordon-Larsen, P., & Popkin, B. M. (2015). US Household Food Shopping Patterns: Dynamic Shifts Since 2000 And Socioeconomic Predictors. Health Affairs (Project Hope), 34(11), 1840-8. https://doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.2015.0449
Stern D, et al. US Household Food Shopping Patterns: Dynamic Shifts Since 2000 and Socioeconomic Predictors. Health Aff (Millwood). 2015;34(11):1840-8. PubMed PMID: 26526241.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - US Household Food Shopping Patterns: Dynamic Shifts Since 2000 And Socioeconomic Predictors. AU - Stern,Dalia, AU - Robinson,Whitney R, AU - Ng,Shu Wen, AU - Gordon-Larsen,Penny, AU - Popkin,Barry M, PY - 2015/11/4/entrez PY - 2015/11/4/pubmed PY - 2017/1/24/medline KW - Disparities KW - Epidemiology KW - Food stores KW - Public Health SP - 1840 EP - 8 JF - Health affairs (Project Hope) JO - Health Aff (Millwood) VL - 34 IS - 11 N2 - Under the assumption that differential food access might underlie nutritional disparities, programs and policies have focused on the need to build supermarkets in underserved areas, in an effort to improve dietary quality. However, there is limited evidence about which types of stores are used by households of different income levels and differing races/ethnicities. We used cross-sectional cluster analysis to derive shopping patterns from US households' volume food purchases by store from 2000 to 2012. Multinomial logistic regression identified household socioeconomic characteristics that were associated with shopping patterns in 2012. We found three food shopping patterns or clusters: households that primarily shopped at grocery stores, households that primarily shopped at mass merchandisers, and a combination cluster in which households split their purchases among multiple store types. In 2012 we found no income or race/ethnicity differences for the cluster of households that primarily shopped at grocery stores. However, low-income non-Hispanic blacks (versus non-Hispanic whites) had a significantly lower probability of belonging to the mass merchandise cluster. These varied shopping patterns must be considered in future policy initiatives. Furthermore, it is important to continue studying the complex rationales for people's food shopping patterns. SN - 1544-5208 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26526241/US_Household_Food_Shopping_Patterns:_Dynamic_Shifts_Since_2000_And_Socioeconomic_Predictors_ L2 - https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/10.1377/hlthaff.2015.0449?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -