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Burkholderia pseudomallei Genotype Distribution in the Northern Territory, Australia.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2016 Jan; 94(1):68-72.AJ

Abstract

Melioidosis is a tropical disease of high mortality caused by the environmental bacterium, Burkholderia pseudomallei. We have collected clinical isolates from the highly endemic Northern Territory of Australia routinely since 1989, and animal and environmental B. pseudomallei isolates since 1991. Here we provide a complete record of all B. pseudomallei multilocus sequence types (STs) found in the Northern Territory to date, and distribution maps of the eight most common environmental STs. We observed surprisingly restricted geographic distributions of STs, which is contrary to previous reports suggesting widespread environmental dissemination of this bacterium. Our data suggest that B. pseudomallei from soil and water does not frequently disperse long distances following severe weather events or by migration of infected animals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia; Melbourne Medical School, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Imperial College, London, United Kingdom; Department of Infectious Diseases and Northern Territory Medical Program, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia; Melbourne Medical School, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Imperial College, London, United Kingdom; Department of Infectious Diseases and Northern Territory Medical Program, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia; Melbourne Medical School, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Imperial College, London, United Kingdom; Department of Infectious Diseases and Northern Territory Medical Program, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia; Melbourne Medical School, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Imperial College, London, United Kingdom; Department of Infectious Diseases and Northern Territory Medical Program, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia; Melbourne Medical School, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Imperial College, London, United Kingdom; Department of Infectious Diseases and Northern Territory Medical Program, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia; Melbourne Medical School, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Imperial College, London, United Kingdom; Department of Infectious Diseases and Northern Territory Medical Program, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia; Melbourne Medical School, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Imperial College, London, United Kingdom; Department of Infectious Diseases and Northern Territory Medical Program, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia; Melbourne Medical School, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Imperial College, London, United Kingdom; Department of Infectious Diseases and Northern Territory Medical Program, Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia bart.currie@menzies.edu.au.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26526925

Citation

Chapple, Stephanie N J., et al. "Burkholderia Pseudomallei Genotype Distribution in the Northern Territory, Australia." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 94, no. 1, 2016, pp. 68-72.
Chapple SN, Price EP, Sarovich DS, et al. Burkholderia pseudomallei Genotype Distribution in the Northern Territory, Australia. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2016;94(1):68-72.
Chapple, S. N., Price, E. P., Sarovich, D. S., McRobb, E., Mayo, M., Kaestli, M., Spratt, B. G., & Currie, B. J. (2016). Burkholderia pseudomallei Genotype Distribution in the Northern Territory, Australia. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 94(1), 68-72. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.15-0627
Chapple SN, et al. Burkholderia Pseudomallei Genotype Distribution in the Northern Territory, Australia. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2016;94(1):68-72. PubMed PMID: 26526925.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Burkholderia pseudomallei Genotype Distribution in the Northern Territory, Australia. AU - Chapple,Stephanie N J, AU - Price,Erin P, AU - Sarovich,Derek S, AU - McRobb,Evan, AU - Mayo,Mark, AU - Kaestli,Mirjam, AU - Spratt,Brian G, AU - Currie,Bart J, Y1 - 2015/11/02/ PY - 2015/08/26/received PY - 2015/09/22/accepted PY - 2015/11/4/entrez PY - 2015/11/4/pubmed PY - 2016/5/27/medline SP - 68 EP - 72 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am J Trop Med Hyg VL - 94 IS - 1 N2 - Melioidosis is a tropical disease of high mortality caused by the environmental bacterium, Burkholderia pseudomallei. We have collected clinical isolates from the highly endemic Northern Territory of Australia routinely since 1989, and animal and environmental B. pseudomallei isolates since 1991. Here we provide a complete record of all B. pseudomallei multilocus sequence types (STs) found in the Northern Territory to date, and distribution maps of the eight most common environmental STs. We observed surprisingly restricted geographic distributions of STs, which is contrary to previous reports suggesting widespread environmental dissemination of this bacterium. Our data suggest that B. pseudomallei from soil and water does not frequently disperse long distances following severe weather events or by migration of infected animals. SN - 1476-1645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26526925/Burkholderia_pseudomallei_Genotype_Distribution_in_the_Northern_Territory_Australia_ L2 - https://ajtmh.org/doi/10.4269/ajtmh.15-0627 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -