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Respiratory infectious phenotypes in acute exacerbation of COPD: an aid to length of stay and COPD Assessment Test.

Abstract

PURPOSE

To investigate the respiratory infectious phenotypes and their impact on length of stay (LOS) and the COPD Assessment Test (CAT) Scale in acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD).

PATIENTS AND METHODS

We categorized 81 eligible patients into bacterial infection, viral infection, coinfection, and non-infectious groups. The respiratory virus examination was determined by a liquid bead array xTAG Respiratory Virus Panel in pharyngeal swabs, while bacterial infection was studied by conventional sputum culture. LOS and CAT as well as demographic information were recorded.

RESULTS

Viruses were detected in 38 subjects, bacteria in 17, and of these, seven had both. Influenza virus was the most frequently isolated virus, followed by enterovirus/rhinovirus, coronavirus, bocavirus, metapneumovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1, 2, 3, and 4, and respiratory syncytial virus. Bacteriologic analyses of sputum showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most common bacteria, followed by Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The longest LOS and the highest CAT score were detected in coinfection group. CAT score was positively correlated with LOS.

CONCLUSION

Respiratory infection is a common causative agent of exacerbations in COPD. Respiratory coinfection is likely to be a determinant of more severe acute exacerbations with longer LOS. CAT score may be a predictor of longer LOS in AECOPD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pulmonary Department, First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, People's Republic of China.Department of Clinical Laboratory, First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, People's Republic of China.Department of Clinical Laboratory, First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, People's Republic of China.Pulmonary Department, First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, People's Republic of China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26527871

Citation

Dai, Meng-Yuan, et al. "Respiratory Infectious Phenotypes in Acute Exacerbation of COPD: an Aid to Length of Stay and COPD Assessment Test." International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, vol. 10, 2015, pp. 2257-63.
Dai MY, Qiao JP, Xu YH, et al. Respiratory infectious phenotypes in acute exacerbation of COPD: an aid to length of stay and COPD Assessment Test. Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2015;10:2257-63.
Dai, M. Y., Qiao, J. P., Xu, Y. H., & Fei, G. H. (2015). Respiratory infectious phenotypes in acute exacerbation of COPD: an aid to length of stay and COPD Assessment Test. International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, 10, pp. 2257-63. doi:10.2147/COPD.S92160.
Dai MY, et al. Respiratory Infectious Phenotypes in Acute Exacerbation of COPD: an Aid to Length of Stay and COPD Assessment Test. Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2015;10:2257-63. PubMed PMID: 26527871.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Respiratory infectious phenotypes in acute exacerbation of COPD: an aid to length of stay and COPD Assessment Test. AU - Dai,Meng-Yuan, AU - Qiao,Jin-Ping, AU - Xu,Yuan-Hong, AU - Fei,Guang-He, Y1 - 2015/10/20/ PY - 2015/11/4/entrez PY - 2015/11/4/pubmed PY - 2016/7/12/medline KW - CAT KW - COPD KW - LOS KW - acute exacerbation KW - phenotypes KW - respiratory infectious SP - 2257 EP - 63 JF - International journal of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease JO - Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis VL - 10 N2 - PURPOSE: To investigate the respiratory infectious phenotypes and their impact on length of stay (LOS) and the COPD Assessment Test (CAT) Scale in acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We categorized 81 eligible patients into bacterial infection, viral infection, coinfection, and non-infectious groups. The respiratory virus examination was determined by a liquid bead array xTAG Respiratory Virus Panel in pharyngeal swabs, while bacterial infection was studied by conventional sputum culture. LOS and CAT as well as demographic information were recorded. RESULTS: Viruses were detected in 38 subjects, bacteria in 17, and of these, seven had both. Influenza virus was the most frequently isolated virus, followed by enterovirus/rhinovirus, coronavirus, bocavirus, metapneumovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1, 2, 3, and 4, and respiratory syncytial virus. Bacteriologic analyses of sputum showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most common bacteria, followed by Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The longest LOS and the highest CAT score were detected in coinfection group. CAT score was positively correlated with LOS. CONCLUSION: Respiratory infection is a common causative agent of exacerbations in COPD. Respiratory coinfection is likely to be a determinant of more severe acute exacerbations with longer LOS. CAT score may be a predictor of longer LOS in AECOPD. SN - 1178-2005 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26527871/Respiratory_infectious_phenotypes_in_acute_exacerbation_of_COPD:_an_aid_to_length_of_stay_and_COPD_Assessment_Test_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S92160 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -