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Association of Metabolic Syndrome with Chronic Kidney Disease in Elderly Japanese Women: Comparison by Estimation of Glomerular Filtration Rate from Creatinine, Cystatin C, and Both.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Associations between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) has not been extensively studied in elderly Asians, who in general have lower body mass index (BMI) than European populations.

METHODS

A cross-sectional analysis was conducted including 159 community-living elderly Japanese women. MetS was defined by the modified National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, but using a BMI ≥25 kg/m(2) instead of waist circumference and renal function was assessed according to the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative CKD classification. Creatinine-based and cystatin C-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the average of the two eGFRS were used.

RESULTS

Prevalence of CKD was much higher when creatinine-based eGFR was used than the prevalence obtained when cystatin-C based equations were used (46.5% vs. 12.6%, P < 0.001). Eighteen (11.3%) women met MetS criteria. Both the presence of MetS and the number of MetS components were associated with higher prevalence of CKD using the average eGFR (all P < 0.05) but not using creatinine-based (P = 0.86) and cystatin C-based (P = 0.12) eGFR alone. Lower average eGFR and higher prevalence of CKD using average eGFR were evident in even women with only one MetS component, 89% of whom had elevated blood pressure.

CONCLUSIONS

Prevalence of CKD varied substantially depending on the used equation. In nonobese, elderly Japanese women, both the presence of MetS and the number of MetS components were associated with higher prevalence of CKD and elevated blood pressure may play an important role in these associations. These findings should be confirmed in studies employing more participants with MetS diagnosed using standard criteria (waist circumference instead of BMI).

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    1 Department of Food Sciences and Nutrition, School of Human Environmental Sciences, Mukogawa Women's University , Nishinomiya, Hyogo, Japan . 2 Research Institutes for Nutrition Sciences, School of Human Environmental Sciences, Mukogawa Women's University , Nishinomiya, Hyogo, Japan .

    ,

    2 Research Institutes for Nutrition Sciences, School of Human Environmental Sciences, Mukogawa Women's University , Nishinomiya, Hyogo, Japan .

    ,

    1 Department of Food Sciences and Nutrition, School of Human Environmental Sciences, Mukogawa Women's University , Nishinomiya, Hyogo, Japan .

    ,

    1 Department of Food Sciences and Nutrition, School of Human Environmental Sciences, Mukogawa Women's University , Nishinomiya, Hyogo, Japan . 2 Research Institutes for Nutrition Sciences, School of Human Environmental Sciences, Mukogawa Women's University , Nishinomiya, Hyogo, Japan . 3 Postgraduate School of Food Sciences and Nutrition, School of Human Environmental Sciences, Mukogawa Women's University , Nishinomiya, Hyogo, Japan .

    2 Research Institutes for Nutrition Sciences, School of Human Environmental Sciences, Mukogawa Women's University , Nishinomiya, Hyogo, Japan .

    Source

    MeSH

    Age Factors
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Asian Continental Ancestry Group
    Biomarkers
    Body Mass Index
    Creatinine
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Cystatin C
    Female
    Glomerular Filtration Rate
    Humans
    Hypertension
    Japan
    Kidney
    Metabolic Syndrome
    Models, Biological
    Obesity
    Predictive Value of Tests
    Prevalence
    Renal Insufficiency, Chronic
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26535975

    Citation

    Kurata, Miki, et al. "Association of Metabolic Syndrome With Chronic Kidney Disease in Elderly Japanese Women: Comparison By Estimation of Glomerular Filtration Rate From Creatinine, Cystatin C, and Both." Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, vol. 14, no. 1, 2016, pp. 40-5.
    Kurata M, Tsuboi A, Takeuchi M, et al. Association of Metabolic Syndrome with Chronic Kidney Disease in Elderly Japanese Women: Comparison by Estimation of Glomerular Filtration Rate from Creatinine, Cystatin C, and Both. Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2016;14(1):40-5.
    Kurata, M., Tsuboi, A., Takeuchi, M., Fukuo, K., & Kazumi, T. (2016). Association of Metabolic Syndrome with Chronic Kidney Disease in Elderly Japanese Women: Comparison by Estimation of Glomerular Filtration Rate from Creatinine, Cystatin C, and Both. Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, 14(1), pp. 40-5. doi:10.1089/met.2015.0085.
    Kurata M, et al. Association of Metabolic Syndrome With Chronic Kidney Disease in Elderly Japanese Women: Comparison By Estimation of Glomerular Filtration Rate From Creatinine, Cystatin C, and Both. Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2016;14(1):40-5. PubMed PMID: 26535975.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Association of Metabolic Syndrome with Chronic Kidney Disease in Elderly Japanese Women: Comparison by Estimation of Glomerular Filtration Rate from Creatinine, Cystatin C, and Both. AU - Kurata,Miki, AU - Tsuboi,Ayaka, AU - Takeuchi,Mika, AU - Fukuo,Keisuke, AU - Kazumi,Tsutomu, Y1 - 2015/11/04/ PY - 2015/11/5/entrez PY - 2015/11/5/pubmed PY - 2016/11/12/medline SP - 40 EP - 5 JF - Metabolic syndrome and related disorders JO - Metab Syndr Relat Disord VL - 14 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Associations between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) has not been extensively studied in elderly Asians, who in general have lower body mass index (BMI) than European populations. METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis was conducted including 159 community-living elderly Japanese women. MetS was defined by the modified National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, but using a BMI ≥25 kg/m(2) instead of waist circumference and renal function was assessed according to the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative CKD classification. Creatinine-based and cystatin C-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the average of the two eGFRS were used. RESULTS: Prevalence of CKD was much higher when creatinine-based eGFR was used than the prevalence obtained when cystatin-C based equations were used (46.5% vs. 12.6%, P < 0.001). Eighteen (11.3%) women met MetS criteria. Both the presence of MetS and the number of MetS components were associated with higher prevalence of CKD using the average eGFR (all P < 0.05) but not using creatinine-based (P = 0.86) and cystatin C-based (P = 0.12) eGFR alone. Lower average eGFR and higher prevalence of CKD using average eGFR were evident in even women with only one MetS component, 89% of whom had elevated blood pressure. CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of CKD varied substantially depending on the used equation. In nonobese, elderly Japanese women, both the presence of MetS and the number of MetS components were associated with higher prevalence of CKD and elevated blood pressure may play an important role in these associations. These findings should be confirmed in studies employing more participants with MetS diagnosed using standard criteria (waist circumference instead of BMI). SN - 1557-8518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26535975/Association_of_Metabolic_Syndrome_with_Chronic_Kidney_Disease_in_Elderly_Japanese_Women:_Comparison_by_Estimation_of_Glomerular_Filtration_Rate_from_Creatinine_Cystatin_C_and_Both_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/met.2015.0085?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -