Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Weighing the evidence on the pill and breast cancer.
Fam Plann Perspect. 1989 Mar-Apr; 21(2):89-92.FP

Abstract

Three new studies have found some connection between oral contraceptive use and breast cancer among women younger than 45. None of the studies find an increased risk of breast cancer among the same subgroups of women, and their results are contradictory. Consequently, a committee advising the U.S. Food and Drug Administration concluded that "the existing data do not support a change in prescribing practices by physicians or in the use of oral contraceptives by women." One of the three studies, a U.S. hospital-based analysis of breast cancer patients, showed ever-users of the pill to have a statistically significant risk of breast cancer of 2.0 compared with never-users. The relative risk was elevated in virtually all duration-of-use categories. A significantly increased relative risk was also found among ever-users aged 30-34 and 35-39, among those who did not experience menarche until age 14 or older and among those who were parous. A new analysis of data from the U.S. population-based Cancer and Steroid Hormone Study found no increased risk among parous women or those who had used the pill for less than eight years. However, nulliparous women who had experienced menarche prior to age 13 and had used the pill for eight or more years did have a significantly increased relative risk. Most of the increased risk was confined to women who had begun pill use as teenagers; they had a relative risk of 5.6 compared with never-users.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2653859

Citation

Johnson, J H.. "Weighing the Evidence On the Pill and Breast Cancer." Family Planning Perspectives, vol. 21, no. 2, 1989, pp. 89-92.
Johnson JH. Weighing the evidence on the pill and breast cancer. Fam Plann Perspect. 1989;21(2):89-92.
Johnson, J. H. (1989). Weighing the evidence on the pill and breast cancer. Family Planning Perspectives, 21(2), 89-92.
Johnson JH. Weighing the Evidence On the Pill and Breast Cancer. Fam Plann Perspect. 1989 Mar-Apr;21(2):89-92. PubMed PMID: 2653859.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Weighing the evidence on the pill and breast cancer. A1 - Johnson,J H, PY - 1989/3/1/pubmed PY - 1989/3/1/medline PY - 1989/3/1/entrez KW - Age Factors KW - Biology KW - Breast Cancer--etiology KW - Cancer KW - Clinical Research KW - Contraception KW - Contraceptive Agents KW - Contraceptive Agents, Female KW - Contraceptive Methods--side effects KW - Demographic Factors KW - Diseases KW - Family Planning KW - Fertility KW - Fertility Measurements KW - Menarche KW - Menstruation KW - Neoplasms KW - Oral Contraceptives--side effects KW - Parity KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Population Dynamics KW - Reproduction KW - Research Methodology KW - Risk Factors SP - 89 EP - 92 JF - Family planning perspectives JO - Fam Plann Perspect VL - 21 IS - 2 N2 - Three new studies have found some connection between oral contraceptive use and breast cancer among women younger than 45. None of the studies find an increased risk of breast cancer among the same subgroups of women, and their results are contradictory. Consequently, a committee advising the U.S. Food and Drug Administration concluded that "the existing data do not support a change in prescribing practices by physicians or in the use of oral contraceptives by women." One of the three studies, a U.S. hospital-based analysis of breast cancer patients, showed ever-users of the pill to have a statistically significant risk of breast cancer of 2.0 compared with never-users. The relative risk was elevated in virtually all duration-of-use categories. A significantly increased relative risk was also found among ever-users aged 30-34 and 35-39, among those who did not experience menarche until age 14 or older and among those who were parous. A new analysis of data from the U.S. population-based Cancer and Steroid Hormone Study found no increased risk among parous women or those who had used the pill for less than eight years. However, nulliparous women who had experienced menarche prior to age 13 and had used the pill for eight or more years did have a significantly increased relative risk. Most of the increased risk was confined to women who had begun pill use as teenagers; they had a relative risk of 5.6 compared with never-users.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0014-7354 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2653859/Weighing_the_evidence_on_the_pill_and_breast_cancer_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/960 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.