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Association between anthropometric indices and cardiometabolic risk factors in pre-school children.
BMC Pediatr. 2015 Nov 06; 15:170.BPed

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The world health organization (WHO) and the Identification and prevention of dietary- and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants- study (IDEFICS), released anthropometric reference values obtained from normal body weight children. This study examined the relationship between WHO [body mass index (BMI) and triceps- and subscapular-skinfolds], and IDEFICS (waist circumference, waist to height ratio and fat mass index) anthropometric indices with cardiometabolic risk factors in pre-school children ranging from normal body weight to obesity.

METHODS

A cross-sectional study with 232 children (aged 4.1 ± 0.05 years) was performed. Anthropometric measurements were collected and BMI, waist circumference, waist to height ratio, triceps- and subscapular-skinfolds sum and fat mass index were calculated. Fasting glucose, fasting insulin, homeostasis model analysis insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), blood lipids and apolipoprotein (Apo) B-100 (Apo B) and Apo A-I were determined. Pearson's correlation coefficient, multiple regression analysis and the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis were run.

RESULTS

51% (n = 73) of the boys and 52% (n = 47) of the girls were of normal body weight, 49% (n = 69) of the boys and 48% (n = 43) of the girls were overweight or obese. Anthropometric indices correlated (p < 0.001) with insulin: [BMI (r = 0.514), waist circumference (r = 0.524), waist to height ratio (r = 0.304), triceps- and subscapular-skinfolds sum (r = 0.514) and fat mass index (r = 0.500)], and HOMA-IR: [BMI (r = 0.509), waist circumference (r = 0.521), waist to height ratio (r = 0.296), triceps- and subscapular-skinfolds sum (r = 0.483) and fat mass index (r = 0.492)]. Similar results were obtained after adjusting by age and sex. The areas under the curve (AUC) to identify children with insulin resistance were significant (p < 0.001) and similar among anthropometric indices (AUC > 0.68 to AUC < 0.76).

CONCLUSIONS

WHO and IDEFICS anthropometric indices correlated similarly with fasting insulin and HOMA-IR. The diagnostic accuracy of the anthropometric indices as a proxy to identify children with insulin resistance was similar. These data do not support the use of waist circumference, waist to height ratio, triceps- and subscapular- skinfolds sum or fat mass index, instead of the BMI as a proxy to identify pre-school children with insulin resistance, the most frequent alteration found in children ranging from normal body weight to obesity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Nutrition and Dietetics, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín, Colombia. juan.aristizabal@udea.edu.co.Basic and Applied Microbiology Research Group (MICROBA), School of Microbiology, Program of Ophidism, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín, Colombia. maria.barona@udea.edu.co.Unit of Food Security, Secretary of Social Inclusion and Family, Alcaldía de Medellín, Colombia. marceho2@gmail.com.Unit of Food Security, Secretary of Social Inclusion and Family, Alcaldía de Medellín, Colombia. marceruizpi@gmail.com.Basic and Applied Microbiology Research Group (MICROBA), School of Microbiology, Program of Ophidism, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín, Colombia. catam2224@hotmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26546280

Citation

Aristizabal, Juan C., et al. "Association Between Anthropometric Indices and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Pre-school Children." BMC Pediatrics, vol. 15, 2015, p. 170.
Aristizabal JC, Barona J, Hoyos M, et al. Association between anthropometric indices and cardiometabolic risk factors in pre-school children. BMC Pediatr. 2015;15:170.
Aristizabal, J. C., Barona, J., Hoyos, M., Ruiz, M., & Marín, C. (2015). Association between anthropometric indices and cardiometabolic risk factors in pre-school children. BMC Pediatrics, 15, 170. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12887-015-0500-y
Aristizabal JC, et al. Association Between Anthropometric Indices and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Pre-school Children. BMC Pediatr. 2015 Nov 6;15:170. PubMed PMID: 26546280.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between anthropometric indices and cardiometabolic risk factors in pre-school children. AU - Aristizabal,Juan C, AU - Barona,Jacqueline, AU - Hoyos,Marcela, AU - Ruiz,Marcela, AU - Marín,Catalina, Y1 - 2015/11/06/ PY - 2015/05/13/received PY - 2015/11/02/accepted PY - 2015/11/8/entrez PY - 2015/11/8/pubmed PY - 2016/4/1/medline SP - 170 EP - 170 JF - BMC pediatrics JO - BMC Pediatr VL - 15 N2 - BACKGROUND: The world health organization (WHO) and the Identification and prevention of dietary- and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants- study (IDEFICS), released anthropometric reference values obtained from normal body weight children. This study examined the relationship between WHO [body mass index (BMI) and triceps- and subscapular-skinfolds], and IDEFICS (waist circumference, waist to height ratio and fat mass index) anthropometric indices with cardiometabolic risk factors in pre-school children ranging from normal body weight to obesity. METHODS: A cross-sectional study with 232 children (aged 4.1 ± 0.05 years) was performed. Anthropometric measurements were collected and BMI, waist circumference, waist to height ratio, triceps- and subscapular-skinfolds sum and fat mass index were calculated. Fasting glucose, fasting insulin, homeostasis model analysis insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), blood lipids and apolipoprotein (Apo) B-100 (Apo B) and Apo A-I were determined. Pearson's correlation coefficient, multiple regression analysis and the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis were run. RESULTS: 51% (n = 73) of the boys and 52% (n = 47) of the girls were of normal body weight, 49% (n = 69) of the boys and 48% (n = 43) of the girls were overweight or obese. Anthropometric indices correlated (p < 0.001) with insulin: [BMI (r = 0.514), waist circumference (r = 0.524), waist to height ratio (r = 0.304), triceps- and subscapular-skinfolds sum (r = 0.514) and fat mass index (r = 0.500)], and HOMA-IR: [BMI (r = 0.509), waist circumference (r = 0.521), waist to height ratio (r = 0.296), triceps- and subscapular-skinfolds sum (r = 0.483) and fat mass index (r = 0.492)]. Similar results were obtained after adjusting by age and sex. The areas under the curve (AUC) to identify children with insulin resistance were significant (p < 0.001) and similar among anthropometric indices (AUC > 0.68 to AUC < 0.76). CONCLUSIONS: WHO and IDEFICS anthropometric indices correlated similarly with fasting insulin and HOMA-IR. The diagnostic accuracy of the anthropometric indices as a proxy to identify children with insulin resistance was similar. These data do not support the use of waist circumference, waist to height ratio, triceps- and subscapular- skinfolds sum or fat mass index, instead of the BMI as a proxy to identify pre-school children with insulin resistance, the most frequent alteration found in children ranging from normal body weight to obesity. SN - 1471-2431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26546280/Association_between_anthropometric_indices_and_cardiometabolic_risk_factors_in_pre_school_children_ L2 - https://bmcpediatr.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12887-015-0500-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -