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Dietary Patterns and Risk of Dementia: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies.
Mol Neurobiol 2016; 53(9):6144-6154MN

Abstract

Dietary patterns and some dietary components have been linked with dementia. We therefore performed a meta-analysis of available studies to determine whether there is an association between diet and risk of dementia. We included eligible articles and estimated risk ratio (RR) with 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CIs). Finally, there were 43 trials that met the inclusion standard. Some food intake was related with decrease of dementia, such as unsaturated fatty acids (RR: 0.84, 95 % CI: [0.74-0.95], P = 0.006), antioxidants (RR: 0.87, 95 % CI: [0.77-0.98], P = 0.026), vitamin B (RR: 0.72, 95 % CI: [0.54-0.96], P = 0.026), and the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) (RR: 0.69, 95 % CI: [0.57-0.84], P < 0.001). Some material intakes were related with increase of dementia, such as aluminum (RR: 2.24, 95 % CI: [1.49-3.37], P < 0.001), smoking (RR: 1.43, 95 % CI: [1.15-1.77], P = 0.001), and low levels of vitamin D (RR: 1.52, 95 % CI: [1.17-1.98], P = 0.002). The effect of some materials needs further investigation, such as fish (RR: 0.79, 95 % CI: [0.59-1.06], P = 0.113), vegetables and fruits (RR: 0.46, 95 % CI: [0.16-1.32], P = 0.149), and alcohol (RR: 0.74, 95 % CI: [0.55- 1.01], P = 0.056). Thus, the MeDi and higher consumption of unsaturated fatty acids, antioxidants, and B vitamins decrease the risk of dementia while smoking and higher consumption of aluminum increase the risk of dementia. Low levels of vitamin D were associated with cognitive decline. The effect of fish, vegetables, fruits, and alcohol needs further investigation. The findings will be of great significance to guide people to prevent dementia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China. dr.tanlan@163.com. Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, School of Medicine, Qingdao University, No. 5 Donghai Middle Road, Qingdao, Shandong Province, 266071, China. dr.tanlan@163.com.Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.Department of Neurology, Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, School of Medicine, Qingdao University, No. 5 Donghai Middle Road, Qingdao, Shandong Province, 266071, China.Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China. yu-jintai@163.com. Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, School of Medicine, Qingdao University, No. 5 Donghai Middle Road, Qingdao, Shandong Province, 266071, China. yu-jintai@163.com. Memory and Aging Center, Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 94158, USA. yu-jintai@163.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26553347

Citation

Cao, Lei, et al. "Dietary Patterns and Risk of Dementia: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies." Molecular Neurobiology, vol. 53, no. 9, 2016, pp. 6144-6154.
Cao L, Tan L, Wang HF, et al. Dietary Patterns and Risk of Dementia: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies. Mol Neurobiol. 2016;53(9):6144-6154.
Cao, L., Tan, L., Wang, H. F., Jiang, T., Zhu, X. C., Lu, H., ... Yu, J. T. (2016). Dietary Patterns and Risk of Dementia: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies. Molecular Neurobiology, 53(9), pp. 6144-6154. doi:10.1007/s12035-015-9516-4.
Cao L, et al. Dietary Patterns and Risk of Dementia: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies. Mol Neurobiol. 2016;53(9):6144-6154. PubMed PMID: 26553347.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary Patterns and Risk of Dementia: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies. AU - Cao,Lei, AU - Tan,Lan, AU - Wang,Hui-Fu, AU - Jiang,Teng, AU - Zhu,Xi-Chen, AU - Lu,Huan, AU - Tan,Meng-Shan, AU - Yu,Jin-Tai, Y1 - 2015/11/09/ PY - 2015/05/26/received PY - 2015/10/27/accepted PY - 2016/11/1/pubmed PY - 2018/1/30/medline PY - 2015/11/11/entrez KW - Alzheimer’s disease KW - Dementia KW - Diet KW - Dietary patterns KW - Meta-analysis KW - The Mediterranean diet SP - 6144 EP - 6154 JF - Molecular neurobiology JO - Mol. Neurobiol. VL - 53 IS - 9 N2 - Dietary patterns and some dietary components have been linked with dementia. We therefore performed a meta-analysis of available studies to determine whether there is an association between diet and risk of dementia. We included eligible articles and estimated risk ratio (RR) with 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CIs). Finally, there were 43 trials that met the inclusion standard. Some food intake was related with decrease of dementia, such as unsaturated fatty acids (RR: 0.84, 95 % CI: [0.74-0.95], P = 0.006), antioxidants (RR: 0.87, 95 % CI: [0.77-0.98], P = 0.026), vitamin B (RR: 0.72, 95 % CI: [0.54-0.96], P = 0.026), and the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) (RR: 0.69, 95 % CI: [0.57-0.84], P < 0.001). Some material intakes were related with increase of dementia, such as aluminum (RR: 2.24, 95 % CI: [1.49-3.37], P < 0.001), smoking (RR: 1.43, 95 % CI: [1.15-1.77], P = 0.001), and low levels of vitamin D (RR: 1.52, 95 % CI: [1.17-1.98], P = 0.002). The effect of some materials needs further investigation, such as fish (RR: 0.79, 95 % CI: [0.59-1.06], P = 0.113), vegetables and fruits (RR: 0.46, 95 % CI: [0.16-1.32], P = 0.149), and alcohol (RR: 0.74, 95 % CI: [0.55- 1.01], P = 0.056). Thus, the MeDi and higher consumption of unsaturated fatty acids, antioxidants, and B vitamins decrease the risk of dementia while smoking and higher consumption of aluminum increase the risk of dementia. Low levels of vitamin D were associated with cognitive decline. The effect of fish, vegetables, fruits, and alcohol needs further investigation. The findings will be of great significance to guide people to prevent dementia. SN - 1559-1182 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26553347/full_citation L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12035-015-9516-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -