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Support for Food and Beverage Worksite Wellness Strategies and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Among Employed U.S. Adults.
Am J Health Promot 2017; 31(2):128-135AJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption is high among U.S. adults and is associated with obesity. Given that more than 100 million Americans consume food or beverages at work daily, the worksite may be a venue for interventions to reduce SSB consumption. However, the level of support for these interventions is unknown. We examined associations between workday SSB intake and employees' support for worksite wellness strategies (WWSs).

DESIGN

We conducted a cross-sectional study using data from Web-based annual surveys that gather information on health-related attitudes and behaviors.

SETTING

Study setting was the United States.

SUBJECTS

A total of 1924 employed adults (≥18 years) selected using probability-based sampling.

MEASURES

The self-reported independent variable was workday SSB intake (0, <1 or ≥1 times per day), and dependent variables were employees' support (yes/no) for the following WWSs: (1) accessible free water, (2) affordable healthy food/drink, (3) available healthy options, and (4) less available SSB.

ANALYSIS

Multivariable logistic regression was used to control for sociodemographic variables, employee size, and availability of cafeteria/vending machine.

RESULTS

About half of employees supported accessible free water (54%), affordable healthy food/drink (49%), and available healthy options (46%), but only 28% supported less available SSB. Compared with non-SSB consumers, daily SSB consumers were significantly less supportive of accessible free water (adjusted odds ratio, .67; p < .05) or less available SSB (odds ratio, .49; p < .05).

CONCLUSION

Almost half of employees supported increasing healthy options within worksites, although daily workday SSB consumers were less supportive of certain strategies. Lack of support could be a potential barrier to the successful implementation of certain worksite interventions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.2 Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.2 Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.2 Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.2 Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26559714

Citation

Lee-Kwan, Seung Hee, et al. "Support for Food and Beverage Worksite Wellness Strategies and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Among Employed U.S. Adults." American Journal of Health Promotion : AJHP, vol. 31, no. 2, 2017, pp. 128-135.
Lee-Kwan SH, Pan L, Kimmons J, et al. Support for Food and Beverage Worksite Wellness Strategies and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Among Employed U.S. Adults. Am J Health Promot. 2017;31(2):128-135.
Lee-Kwan, S. H., Pan, L., Kimmons, J., Foltz, J., & Park, S. (2017). Support for Food and Beverage Worksite Wellness Strategies and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Among Employed U.S. Adults. American Journal of Health Promotion : AJHP, 31(2), pp. 128-135. doi:10.4278/ajhp.141113-QUAN-575.
Lee-Kwan SH, et al. Support for Food and Beverage Worksite Wellness Strategies and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Among Employed U.S. Adults. Am J Health Promot. 2017;31(2):128-135. PubMed PMID: 26559714.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Support for Food and Beverage Worksite Wellness Strategies and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Among Employed U.S. Adults. AU - Lee-Kwan,Seung Hee, AU - Pan,Liping, AU - Kimmons,Joel, AU - Foltz,Jennifer, AU - Park,Sohyun, Y1 - 2016/11/17/ PY - 2015/11/13/pubmed PY - 2017/10/27/medline PY - 2015/11/13/entrez KW - Adults KW - Health focus: nutrition KW - Intervention KW - Manuscript format: research KW - Outcome measure: behavioral KW - Prevention Research KW - Research purpose: relationship testing KW - Setting: worksite KW - Study design: cross-sectional KW - Sugar-Sweetened Beverage KW - Target population age: adults KW - Target population circumstances: employed U.S. adults KW - Wellness KW - Worksite SP - 128 EP - 135 JF - American journal of health promotion : AJHP JO - Am J Health Promot VL - 31 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption is high among U.S. adults and is associated with obesity. Given that more than 100 million Americans consume food or beverages at work daily, the worksite may be a venue for interventions to reduce SSB consumption. However, the level of support for these interventions is unknown. We examined associations between workday SSB intake and employees' support for worksite wellness strategies (WWSs). DESIGN: We conducted a cross-sectional study using data from Web-based annual surveys that gather information on health-related attitudes and behaviors. SETTING: Study setting was the United States. SUBJECTS: A total of 1924 employed adults (≥18 years) selected using probability-based sampling. MEASURES: The self-reported independent variable was workday SSB intake (0, <1 or ≥1 times per day), and dependent variables were employees' support (yes/no) for the following WWSs: (1) accessible free water, (2) affordable healthy food/drink, (3) available healthy options, and (4) less available SSB. ANALYSIS: Multivariable logistic regression was used to control for sociodemographic variables, employee size, and availability of cafeteria/vending machine. RESULTS: About half of employees supported accessible free water (54%), affordable healthy food/drink (49%), and available healthy options (46%), but only 28% supported less available SSB. Compared with non-SSB consumers, daily SSB consumers were significantly less supportive of accessible free water (adjusted odds ratio, .67; p < .05) or less available SSB (odds ratio, .49; p < .05). CONCLUSION: Almost half of employees supported increasing healthy options within worksites, although daily workday SSB consumers were less supportive of certain strategies. Lack of support could be a potential barrier to the successful implementation of certain worksite interventions. SN - 2168-6602 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26559714/Support_for_Food_and_Beverage_Worksite_Wellness_Strategies_and_Sugar_Sweetened_Beverage_Intake_Among_Employed_U_S__Adults_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.4278/ajhp.141113-QUAN-575?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -