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Are strict vegetarians protected against prostate cancer?
Am J Clin Nutr 2016; 103(1):153-60AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

According to the American Cancer Society, prostate cancer accounts for ∼27% of all incident cancer cases among men and is the second most common (noncutaneous) cancer among men. The relation between diet and prostate cancer is still unclear. Because people do not consume individual foods but rather foods in combination, the assessment of dietary patterns may offer valuable information when determining associations between diet and prostate cancer risk.

OBJECTIVE

This study aimed to examine the association between dietary patterns (nonvegetarian, lacto-ovo-vegetarian, pesco-vegetarian, vegan, and semi-vegetarian) and prostate cancer incidence among 26,346 male participants of the Adventist Health Study-2.

DESIGN

In this prospective cohort study, cancer cases were identified by matching to cancer registries. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to estimate HRs by using age as the time variable.

RESULTS

In total, 1079 incident prostate cancer cases were identified. Around 8% of the study population reported adherence to the vegan diet. Vegan diets showed a statistically significant protective association with prostate cancer risk (HR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.49, 0.85). After stratifying by race, the statistically significant association with a vegan diet remained only for the whites (HR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.46, 0.86), but the multivariate HR for black vegans showed a similar but nonsignificant point estimate (HR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.41, 1.18).

CONCLUSION

Vegan diets may confer a lower risk of prostate cancer. This lower estimated risk is seen in both white and black vegan subjects, although in the latter, the CI is wider and includes the null.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Public Health, Center for Nutrition, Healthy Lifestyle and Disease Prevention and ytantamango@hotmail.com.School of Public Health, Center for Nutrition, Healthy Lifestyle and Disease Prevention and.School of Public Health, Center for Nutrition, Healthy Lifestyle and Disease Prevention and.School of Public Health, Center for Nutrition, Healthy Lifestyle and Disease Prevention and Department of Community Medicine, Universitetet i Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.School of Public Health, Center for Nutrition, Healthy Lifestyle and Disease Prevention and.School of Public Health, Center for Nutrition, Healthy Lifestyle and Disease Prevention and.School of Public Health, Center for Nutrition, Healthy Lifestyle and Disease Prevention and.School of Medicine, Department of Urology, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA; and.School of Public Health, Center for Nutrition, Healthy Lifestyle and Disease Prevention and.School of Public Health, Center for Nutrition, Healthy Lifestyle and Disease Prevention and.School of Public Health, Center for Nutrition, Healthy Lifestyle and Disease Prevention and.School of Public Health, Center for Nutrition, Healthy Lifestyle and Disease Prevention and.School of Public Health, Center for Nutrition, Healthy Lifestyle and Disease Prevention and.School of Public Health, Center for Nutrition, Healthy Lifestyle and Disease Prevention and.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26561618

Citation

Tantamango-Bartley, Yessenia, et al. "Are Strict Vegetarians Protected Against Prostate Cancer?" The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 103, no. 1, 2016, pp. 153-60.
Tantamango-Bartley Y, Knutsen SF, Knutsen R, et al. Are strict vegetarians protected against prostate cancer? Am J Clin Nutr. 2016;103(1):153-60.
Tantamango-Bartley, Y., Knutsen, S. F., Knutsen, R., Jacobsen, B. K., Fan, J., Beeson, W. L., ... Fraser, G. (2016). Are strict vegetarians protected against prostate cancer? The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 103(1), pp. 153-60. doi:10.3945/ajcn.114.106450.
Tantamango-Bartley Y, et al. Are Strict Vegetarians Protected Against Prostate Cancer. Am J Clin Nutr. 2016;103(1):153-60. PubMed PMID: 26561618.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Are strict vegetarians protected against prostate cancer? AU - Tantamango-Bartley,Yessenia, AU - Knutsen,Synnove F, AU - Knutsen,Raymond, AU - Jacobsen,Bjarne K, AU - Fan,Jing, AU - Beeson,W Lawrence, AU - Sabate,Joan, AU - Hadley,David, AU - Jaceldo-Siegl,Karen, AU - Penniecook,Jason, AU - Herring,Patti, AU - Butler,Terry, AU - Bennett,Hanni, AU - Fraser,Gary, Y1 - 2015/11/11/ PY - 2015/01/07/received PY - 2015/09/23/accepted PY - 2015/11/13/entrez PY - 2015/11/13/pubmed PY - 2016/5/3/medline KW - Adventist KW - cancer KW - diet KW - prostate KW - vegan SP - 153 EP - 60 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 103 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: According to the American Cancer Society, prostate cancer accounts for ∼27% of all incident cancer cases among men and is the second most common (noncutaneous) cancer among men. The relation between diet and prostate cancer is still unclear. Because people do not consume individual foods but rather foods in combination, the assessment of dietary patterns may offer valuable information when determining associations between diet and prostate cancer risk. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine the association between dietary patterns (nonvegetarian, lacto-ovo-vegetarian, pesco-vegetarian, vegan, and semi-vegetarian) and prostate cancer incidence among 26,346 male participants of the Adventist Health Study-2. DESIGN: In this prospective cohort study, cancer cases were identified by matching to cancer registries. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to estimate HRs by using age as the time variable. RESULTS: In total, 1079 incident prostate cancer cases were identified. Around 8% of the study population reported adherence to the vegan diet. Vegan diets showed a statistically significant protective association with prostate cancer risk (HR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.49, 0.85). After stratifying by race, the statistically significant association with a vegan diet remained only for the whites (HR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.46, 0.86), but the multivariate HR for black vegans showed a similar but nonsignificant point estimate (HR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.41, 1.18). CONCLUSION: Vegan diets may confer a lower risk of prostate cancer. This lower estimated risk is seen in both white and black vegan subjects, although in the latter, the CI is wider and includes the null. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26561618/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.114.106450 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -