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Association of Coffee Consumption With Total and Cause-Specific Mortality in 3 Large Prospective Cohorts.
Circulation 2015; 132(24):2305-15Circ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The association between consumption of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and risk of mortality remains inconclusive.

METHODS AND RESULTS

We examined the associations of consumption of total, caffeinated, and decaffeinated coffee with risk of subsequent total and cause-specific mortality among 74,890 women in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS), 93,054 women in the Nurses' Health Study II, and 40,557 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Coffee consumption was assessed at baseline using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. During 4,690,072 person-years of follow-up, 19,524 women and 12,432 men died. Consumption of total, caffeinated, and decaffeinated coffee were nonlinearly associated with mortality. Compared with nondrinkers, coffee consumption of 1 to 5 cups per day was associated with lower risk of mortality, whereas coffee consumption of more than 5 cups per day was not associated with risk of mortality. However, when restricting to never smokers compared with nondrinkers, the hazard ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) of mortality were 0.94 (0.89-0.99) for 1.0 or less cup per day, 0.92 (0.87-0.97) for 1.1 to 3.0 cups per day, 0.85 (0.79-0.92) for 3.1 to 5.0 cup per day, and 0.88 (0.78-0.99) for more than 5.0 cup per day (P value for nonlinearity = 0.32; P value for trend < 0.001). Significant inverse associations were observed for caffeinated (P value for trend < 0.001) and decaffeinated coffee (P value for trend = 0.022). Significant inverse associations were observed between coffee consumption and deaths attributed to cardiovascular disease, neurologic diseases, and suicide. No significant association between coffee consumption and total cancer mortality was found.

CONCLUSIONS

Higher consumption of total coffee, caffeinated coffee, and decaffeinated coffee was associated with lower risk of total mortality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From Departments of Nutrition (M.D., A.S., S.N.B., Y.H., Q.S., W.W., R.M.v.D., F.B.H.) and Epidemiology (M.D., A.S., W.W., F.B.H.), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (Q.S., W.W., F.B.H.); Department of Epidemiology, Fairbanks School of Public Health (J.H.) and Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center (J.H.), Indiana University, Indianapolis; Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid/IdiPAZ, CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health, Madrid, Spain (E.L.-G.); and Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health and Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore (R.M.v.D.).From Departments of Nutrition (M.D., A.S., S.N.B., Y.H., Q.S., W.W., R.M.v.D., F.B.H.) and Epidemiology (M.D., A.S., W.W., F.B.H.), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (Q.S., W.W., F.B.H.); Department of Epidemiology, Fairbanks School of Public Health (J.H.) and Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center (J.H.), Indiana University, Indianapolis; Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid/IdiPAZ, CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health, Madrid, Spain (E.L.-G.); and Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health and Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore (R.M.v.D.).From Departments of Nutrition (M.D., A.S., S.N.B., Y.H., Q.S., W.W., R.M.v.D., F.B.H.) and Epidemiology (M.D., A.S., W.W., F.B.H.), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (Q.S., W.W., F.B.H.); Department of Epidemiology, Fairbanks School of Public Health (J.H.) and Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center (J.H.), Indiana University, Indianapolis; Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid/IdiPAZ, CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health, Madrid, Spain (E.L.-G.); and Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health and Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore (R.M.v.D.).From Departments of Nutrition (M.D., A.S., S.N.B., Y.H., Q.S., W.W., R.M.v.D., F.B.H.) and Epidemiology (M.D., A.S., W.W., F.B.H.), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (Q.S., W.W., F.B.H.); Department of Epidemiology, Fairbanks School of Public Health (J.H.) and Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center (J.H.), Indiana University, Indianapolis; Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid/IdiPAZ, CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health, Madrid, Spain (E.L.-G.); and Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health and Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore (R.M.v.D.).From Departments of Nutrition (M.D., A.S., S.N.B., Y.H., Q.S., W.W., R.M.v.D., F.B.H.) and Epidemiology (M.D., A.S., W.W., F.B.H.), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (Q.S., W.W., F.B.H.); Department of Epidemiology, Fairbanks School of Public Health (J.H.) and Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center (J.H.), Indiana University, Indianapolis; Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid/IdiPAZ, CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health, Madrid, Spain (E.L.-G.); and Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health and Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore (R.M.v.D.).From Departments of Nutrition (M.D., A.S., S.N.B., Y.H., Q.S., W.W., R.M.v.D., F.B.H.) and Epidemiology (M.D., A.S., W.W., F.B.H.), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (Q.S., W.W., F.B.H.); Department of Epidemiology, Fairbanks School of Public Health (J.H.) and Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center (J.H.), Indiana University, Indianapolis; Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid/IdiPAZ, CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health, Madrid, Spain (E.L.-G.); and Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health and Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore (R.M.v.D.).From Departments of Nutrition (M.D., A.S., S.N.B., Y.H., Q.S., W.W., R.M.v.D., F.B.H.) and Epidemiology (M.D., A.S., W.W., F.B.H.), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (Q.S., W.W., F.B.H.); Department of Epidemiology, Fairbanks School of Public Health (J.H.) and Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center (J.H.), Indiana University, Indianapolis; Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid/IdiPAZ, CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health, Madrid, Spain (E.L.-G.); and Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health and Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore (R.M.v.D.).From Departments of Nutrition (M.D., A.S., S.N.B., Y.H., Q.S., W.W., R.M.v.D., F.B.H.) and Epidemiology (M.D., A.S., W.W., F.B.H.), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (Q.S., W.W., F.B.H.); Department of Epidemiology, Fairbanks School of Public Health (J.H.) and Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center (J.H.), Indiana University, Indianapolis; Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid/IdiPAZ, CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health, Madrid, Spain (E.L.-G.); and Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health and Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore (R.M.v.D.).From Departments of Nutrition (M.D., A.S., S.N.B., Y.H., Q.S., W.W., R.M.v.D., F.B.H.) and Epidemiology (M.D., A.S., W.W., F.B.H.), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (Q.S., W.W., F.B.H.); Department of Epidemiology, Fairbanks School of Public Health (J.H.) and Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center (J.H.), Indiana University, Indianapolis; Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid/IdiPAZ, CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health, Madrid, Spain (E.L.-G.); and Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health and Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore (R.M.v.D.).From Departments of Nutrition (M.D., A.S., S.N.B., Y.H., Q.S., W.W., R.M.v.D., F.B.H.) and Epidemiology (M.D., A.S., W.W., F.B.H.), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (Q.S., W.W., F.B.H.); Department of Epidemiology, Fairbanks School of Public Health (J.H.) and Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center (J.H.), Indiana University, Indianapolis; Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid/IdiPAZ, CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health, Madrid, Spain (E.L.-G.); and Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health and Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore (R.M.v.D.). nhbfh@channing.harvard.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26572796

Citation

Ding, Ming, et al. "Association of Coffee Consumption With Total and Cause-Specific Mortality in 3 Large Prospective Cohorts." Circulation, vol. 132, no. 24, 2015, pp. 2305-15.
Ding M, Satija A, Bhupathiraju SN, et al. Association of Coffee Consumption With Total and Cause-Specific Mortality in 3 Large Prospective Cohorts. Circulation. 2015;132(24):2305-15.
Ding, M., Satija, A., Bhupathiraju, S. N., Hu, Y., Sun, Q., Han, J., ... Hu, F. B. (2015). Association of Coffee Consumption With Total and Cause-Specific Mortality in 3 Large Prospective Cohorts. Circulation, 132(24), pp. 2305-15. doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.115.017341.
Ding M, et al. Association of Coffee Consumption With Total and Cause-Specific Mortality in 3 Large Prospective Cohorts. Circulation. 2015 Dec 15;132(24):2305-15. PubMed PMID: 26572796.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of Coffee Consumption With Total and Cause-Specific Mortality in 3 Large Prospective Cohorts. AU - Ding,Ming, AU - Satija,Ambika, AU - Bhupathiraju,Shilpa N, AU - Hu,Yang, AU - Sun,Qi, AU - Han,Jiali, AU - Lopez-Garcia,Esther, AU - Willett,Walter, AU - van Dam,Rob M, AU - Hu,Frank B, Y1 - 2015/11/16/ PY - 2015/06/09/received PY - 2015/09/17/accepted PY - 2015/11/18/entrez PY - 2015/11/18/pubmed PY - 2016/4/23/medline KW - coffee KW - mortality KW - smoking SP - 2305 EP - 15 JF - Circulation JO - Circulation VL - 132 IS - 24 N2 - BACKGROUND: The association between consumption of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and risk of mortality remains inconclusive. METHODS AND RESULTS: We examined the associations of consumption of total, caffeinated, and decaffeinated coffee with risk of subsequent total and cause-specific mortality among 74,890 women in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS), 93,054 women in the Nurses' Health Study II, and 40,557 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Coffee consumption was assessed at baseline using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. During 4,690,072 person-years of follow-up, 19,524 women and 12,432 men died. Consumption of total, caffeinated, and decaffeinated coffee were nonlinearly associated with mortality. Compared with nondrinkers, coffee consumption of 1 to 5 cups per day was associated with lower risk of mortality, whereas coffee consumption of more than 5 cups per day was not associated with risk of mortality. However, when restricting to never smokers compared with nondrinkers, the hazard ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) of mortality were 0.94 (0.89-0.99) for 1.0 or less cup per day, 0.92 (0.87-0.97) for 1.1 to 3.0 cups per day, 0.85 (0.79-0.92) for 3.1 to 5.0 cup per day, and 0.88 (0.78-0.99) for more than 5.0 cup per day (P value for nonlinearity = 0.32; P value for trend < 0.001). Significant inverse associations were observed for caffeinated (P value for trend < 0.001) and decaffeinated coffee (P value for trend = 0.022). Significant inverse associations were observed between coffee consumption and deaths attributed to cardiovascular disease, neurologic diseases, and suicide. No significant association between coffee consumption and total cancer mortality was found. CONCLUSIONS: Higher consumption of total coffee, caffeinated coffee, and decaffeinated coffee was associated with lower risk of total mortality. SN - 1524-4539 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26572796/Association_of_Coffee_Consumption_With_Total_and_Cause_Specific_Mortality_in_3_Large_Prospective_Cohorts_ L2 - http://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.115.017341?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -