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The Development of the Calvarial Bones and Sutures and the Pathophysiology of Craniosynostosis.
Curr Top Dev Biol 2015; 115:131-56CT

Abstract

The skull vault is a complex, exquisitely patterned structure that plays a variety of key roles in vertebrate life, ranging from the acquisition of food to the support of the sense organs for hearing, smell, sight, and taste. During its development, it must meet the dual challenges of protecting the brain and accommodating its growth. The bones and sutures of the skull vault are derived from cranial neural crest and head mesoderm. The frontal and parietal bones develop from osteogenic rudiments in the supraorbital ridge. The coronal suture develops from a group of Shh-responsive cells in the head mesoderm that are collocated, with the osteogenic precursors, in the supraorbital ridge. The osteogenic rudiments and the prospective coronal suture expand apically by cell migration. A number of congenital disorders affect the skull vault. Prominent among these is craniosynostosis, the fusion of the bones at the sutures. Analysis of the pathophysiology underling craniosynostosis has identified a variety of cellular mechanisms, mediated by a range of signaling pathways and effector transcription factors. These cellular mechanisms include loss of boundary integrity, altered sutural cell specification in embryos, and loss of a suture stem cell population in adults. Future work making use of genome-wide transcriptomic approaches will address the deep structure of regulatory interactions and cellular processes that unify these seemingly diverse mechanisms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. Electronic address: maxson@usc.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26589924

Citation

Ishii, Mamoru, et al. "The Development of the Calvarial Bones and Sutures and the Pathophysiology of Craniosynostosis." Current Topics in Developmental Biology, vol. 115, 2015, pp. 131-56.
Ishii M, Sun J, Ting MC, et al. The Development of the Calvarial Bones and Sutures and the Pathophysiology of Craniosynostosis. Curr Top Dev Biol. 2015;115:131-56.
Ishii, M., Sun, J., Ting, M. C., & Maxson, R. E. (2015). The Development of the Calvarial Bones and Sutures and the Pathophysiology of Craniosynostosis. Current Topics in Developmental Biology, 115, pp. 131-56. doi:10.1016/bs.ctdb.2015.07.004.
Ishii M, et al. The Development of the Calvarial Bones and Sutures and the Pathophysiology of Craniosynostosis. Curr Top Dev Biol. 2015;115:131-56. PubMed PMID: 26589924.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Development of the Calvarial Bones and Sutures and the Pathophysiology of Craniosynostosis. AU - Ishii,Mamoru, AU - Sun,Jingjing, AU - Ting,Man-Chun, AU - Maxson,Robert E, Y1 - 2015/10/01/ PY - 2015/11/22/entrez PY - 2015/11/22/pubmed PY - 2016/9/7/medline KW - Calvaria KW - Cranial sutures KW - Craniosynostosis KW - Frontal bone KW - Head mesoderm KW - Neural crest KW - Osteoblast KW - Parietal bone SP - 131 EP - 56 JF - Current topics in developmental biology JO - Curr. Top. Dev. Biol. VL - 115 N2 - The skull vault is a complex, exquisitely patterned structure that plays a variety of key roles in vertebrate life, ranging from the acquisition of food to the support of the sense organs for hearing, smell, sight, and taste. During its development, it must meet the dual challenges of protecting the brain and accommodating its growth. The bones and sutures of the skull vault are derived from cranial neural crest and head mesoderm. The frontal and parietal bones develop from osteogenic rudiments in the supraorbital ridge. The coronal suture develops from a group of Shh-responsive cells in the head mesoderm that are collocated, with the osteogenic precursors, in the supraorbital ridge. The osteogenic rudiments and the prospective coronal suture expand apically by cell migration. A number of congenital disorders affect the skull vault. Prominent among these is craniosynostosis, the fusion of the bones at the sutures. Analysis of the pathophysiology underling craniosynostosis has identified a variety of cellular mechanisms, mediated by a range of signaling pathways and effector transcription factors. These cellular mechanisms include loss of boundary integrity, altered sutural cell specification in embryos, and loss of a suture stem cell population in adults. Future work making use of genome-wide transcriptomic approaches will address the deep structure of regulatory interactions and cellular processes that unify these seemingly diverse mechanisms. SN - 1557-8933 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26589924/The_Development_of_the_Calvarial_Bones_and_Sutures_and_the_Pathophysiology_of_Craniosynostosis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0070-2153(15)00040-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -