Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Adverse metabolic phenotype of adolescent girls with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease plus polycystic ovary syndrome compared with other girls and boys.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) share risk associations of adiposity and insulin resistance. We examined the impact of a PCOS diagnosis on the metabolic phenotype of adolescent girls with NAFLD and compared this to girls without PCOS or NAFLD and to age-matched boys.

METHODS

Community-based adolescents from the Raine Cohort participated in assessments for NAFLD (572 girls and 592 boys) and PCOS (244 girls). One hundred and ninety-nine girls attended both assessments.

RESULTS

Amongst the 199 girls, PCOS was diagnosed in 16.1% and NAFLD in 18.6%. NAFLD was diagnosed in 10.1% of the boys. NAFLD was more prevalent in girls with PCOS than girls without PCOS (37.5% vs 15.1%, P = 0.003). Girls with NAFLD plus PCOS had greater adiposity (waist circumference, body mass index, suprailiac skinfold thickness [SST], serum androgens, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, ferritin, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and lower serum sex hormone binding globulin levels than girls with NAFLD without a PCOS diagnosis (all P < 0.05). Girls with NAFLD plus PCOS had similar adiposity, HOMA-IR, and adiponectin levels to boys with NAFLD, but more adiposity, serum leptin and HOMA-IR than both girls and boys without NAFLD. PCOS (odds ratios 2.99, 95% confidence intervals 1.01-8.82, P = 0.048) and SST (odds ratios 1.14, 95% confidence intervals 1.08-1.20, P < 0.001) independently predicted NAFLD in adolescent girls, however, serum androgens and HOMA-IR levels did not.

CONCLUSIONS

Adolescent girls with NAFLD plus PCOS have a similar metabolic phenotype to boys with NAFLD. Increasing SST and pre-existing PCOS independently predict NAFLD in adolescent girls.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    School of Medicine and Pharmacology, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Department of Gastroenterology, Fremantle Hospital, Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia. Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

    ,

    School of Medicine and Pharmacology, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Liver Transplantation Unit, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

    ,

    School of Women's and Infants' Health, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

    ,

    School of Medicine and Pharmacology, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

    ,

    School of Medicine and Pharmacology, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

    ,

    Centre for Child Health Research, Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

    ,

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. The Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

    ,

    Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

    ,

    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Department of Gastroenterology, Fremantle Hospital, Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia. Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Murdoch University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

    School of Women's and Infants' Health, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

    Source

    MeSH

    Adiposity
    Adolescent
    Age Distribution
    Biomarkers
    Case-Control Studies
    Chi-Square Distribution
    Female
    Humans
    Insulin Resistance
    Logistic Models
    Male
    Multivariate Analysis
    Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
    Obesity
    Odds Ratio
    Phenotype
    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
    Prevalence
    Risk Factors
    Sex Distribution
    Skinfold Thickness
    Western Australia

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26589977

    Citation

    Ayonrinde, Oyekoya T., et al. "Adverse Metabolic Phenotype of Adolescent Girls With Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Plus Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Compared With Other Girls and Boys." Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 31, no. 5, 2016, pp. 980-7.
    Ayonrinde OT, Adams LA, Doherty DA, et al. Adverse metabolic phenotype of adolescent girls with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease plus polycystic ovary syndrome compared with other girls and boys. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2016;31(5):980-7.
    Ayonrinde, O. T., Adams, L. A., Doherty, D. A., Mori, T. A., Beilin, L. J., Oddy, W. H., ... Hart, R. (2016). Adverse metabolic phenotype of adolescent girls with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease plus polycystic ovary syndrome compared with other girls and boys. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 31(5), pp. 980-7. doi:10.1111/jgh.13241.
    Ayonrinde OT, et al. Adverse Metabolic Phenotype of Adolescent Girls With Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Plus Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Compared With Other Girls and Boys. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2016;31(5):980-7. PubMed PMID: 26589977.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Adverse metabolic phenotype of adolescent girls with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease plus polycystic ovary syndrome compared with other girls and boys. AU - Ayonrinde,Oyekoya T, AU - Adams,Leon A, AU - Doherty,Dorota A, AU - Mori,Trevor A, AU - Beilin,Lawrence J, AU - Oddy,Wendy H, AU - Hickey,Martha, AU - Sloboda,Deborah M, AU - Olynyk,John K, AU - Hart,Roger, PY - 2015/11/14/accepted PY - 2015/11/22/entrez PY - 2015/11/22/pubmed PY - 2017/5/18/medline KW - C-reactive protein KW - Raine study KW - community KW - insulin resistance KW - non-alcoholic fatty liver disease KW - obesity KW - polycystic ovary syndrome KW - testosterone SP - 980 EP - 7 JF - Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology JO - J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. VL - 31 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) share risk associations of adiposity and insulin resistance. We examined the impact of a PCOS diagnosis on the metabolic phenotype of adolescent girls with NAFLD and compared this to girls without PCOS or NAFLD and to age-matched boys. METHODS: Community-based adolescents from the Raine Cohort participated in assessments for NAFLD (572 girls and 592 boys) and PCOS (244 girls). One hundred and ninety-nine girls attended both assessments. RESULTS: Amongst the 199 girls, PCOS was diagnosed in 16.1% and NAFLD in 18.6%. NAFLD was diagnosed in 10.1% of the boys. NAFLD was more prevalent in girls with PCOS than girls without PCOS (37.5% vs 15.1%, P = 0.003). Girls with NAFLD plus PCOS had greater adiposity (waist circumference, body mass index, suprailiac skinfold thickness [SST], serum androgens, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, ferritin, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and lower serum sex hormone binding globulin levels than girls with NAFLD without a PCOS diagnosis (all P < 0.05). Girls with NAFLD plus PCOS had similar adiposity, HOMA-IR, and adiponectin levels to boys with NAFLD, but more adiposity, serum leptin and HOMA-IR than both girls and boys without NAFLD. PCOS (odds ratios 2.99, 95% confidence intervals 1.01-8.82, P = 0.048) and SST (odds ratios 1.14, 95% confidence intervals 1.08-1.20, P < 0.001) independently predicted NAFLD in adolescent girls, however, serum androgens and HOMA-IR levels did not. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescent girls with NAFLD plus PCOS have a similar metabolic phenotype to boys with NAFLD. Increasing SST and pre-existing PCOS independently predict NAFLD in adolescent girls. SN - 1440-1746 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26589977/Adverse_metabolic_phenotype_of_adolescent_girls_with_non_alcoholic_fatty_liver_disease_plus_polycystic_ovary_syndrome_compared_with_other_girls_and_boys_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jgh.13241 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -