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Dietary total fat and fatty acids intake, serum fatty acids and risk of breast cancer: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

Abstract

Results from prospective cohort studies on the association between dietary total fat and fatty acids intake and risk of breast cancer remain controversial. Pertinent prospective cohort studies were identified by a search of Embase and PubMed from inception to September 2015. Study-specific relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals were pooled using a random-effect model. Between-study heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed, and sensitivity analysis was conducted. Twenty-four independent studies on dietary total fat and fatty acids intake and seven studies on serum fatty acids were included. The pooled RR of breast cancer for the highest vs. lowest category of dietary total fat intake was 1.10 (1.02-1.19); however, no association was observed in studies adjusting for traditional risk factors of breast cancer. No association was observed between animal fat, vegetable fat, saturated fatty acids (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), n-3 PUFA, n-6 PUFA, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and arachidonic acid and risk of breast cancer. The pooled RRs of breast cancer for the highest vs. lowest category of serum SFA, MUFA, PUFA, n-3 PUFA and n-6 PUFA were 1.00 (0.78-1.28), 1.41 (0.99-2.03), 0.59 (0.27-1.30), 0.81 (0.60-1.10) and 0.84 (0.60-1.18), respectively. Results from this meta-analysis suggested that dietary total fat and fatty acids might be not associated with risk of breast cancer.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Biochemistry, Qingdao University Medical College, Qingdao, China.

    ,

    Department of Biochemistry, Qingdao University Medical College, Qingdao, China.

    Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, Qingdao University Medical College, Qingdao, China.

    Source

    International journal of cancer 138:8 2016 Apr 15 pg 1894-904

    MeSH

    Breast Neoplasms
    Cohort Studies
    Diet
    Dietary Fats
    Fatty Acids
    Female
    Humans

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26595162

    Citation

    Cao, Yi, et al. "Dietary Total Fat and Fatty Acids Intake, Serum Fatty Acids and Risk of Breast Cancer: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 138, no. 8, 2016, pp. 1894-904.
    Cao Y, Hou L, Wang W. Dietary total fat and fatty acids intake, serum fatty acids and risk of breast cancer: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Int J Cancer. 2016;138(8):1894-904.
    Cao, Y., Hou, L., & Wang, W. (2016). Dietary total fat and fatty acids intake, serum fatty acids and risk of breast cancer: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. International Journal of Cancer, 138(8), pp. 1894-904. doi:10.1002/ijc.29938.
    Cao Y, Hou L, Wang W. Dietary Total Fat and Fatty Acids Intake, Serum Fatty Acids and Risk of Breast Cancer: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. Int J Cancer. 2016 Apr 15;138(8):1894-904. PubMed PMID: 26595162.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary total fat and fatty acids intake, serum fatty acids and risk of breast cancer: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. AU - Cao,Yi, AU - Hou,Lin, AU - Wang,Weijing, Y1 - 2015/12/09/ PY - 2015/09/12/received PY - 2015/10/25/revised PY - 2015/11/18/accepted PY - 2015/11/24/entrez PY - 2015/11/26/pubmed PY - 2016/6/21/medline KW - breast cancer KW - fat KW - fatty acids KW - meta-analysis KW - prospective cohort studies SP - 1894 EP - 904 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 138 IS - 8 N2 - Results from prospective cohort studies on the association between dietary total fat and fatty acids intake and risk of breast cancer remain controversial. Pertinent prospective cohort studies were identified by a search of Embase and PubMed from inception to September 2015. Study-specific relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals were pooled using a random-effect model. Between-study heterogeneity and publication bias were assessed, and sensitivity analysis was conducted. Twenty-four independent studies on dietary total fat and fatty acids intake and seven studies on serum fatty acids were included. The pooled RR of breast cancer for the highest vs. lowest category of dietary total fat intake was 1.10 (1.02-1.19); however, no association was observed in studies adjusting for traditional risk factors of breast cancer. No association was observed between animal fat, vegetable fat, saturated fatty acids (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), n-3 PUFA, n-6 PUFA, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and arachidonic acid and risk of breast cancer. The pooled RRs of breast cancer for the highest vs. lowest category of serum SFA, MUFA, PUFA, n-3 PUFA and n-6 PUFA were 1.00 (0.78-1.28), 1.41 (0.99-2.03), 0.59 (0.27-1.30), 0.81 (0.60-1.10) and 0.84 (0.60-1.18), respectively. Results from this meta-analysis suggested that dietary total fat and fatty acids might be not associated with risk of breast cancer. SN - 1097-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26595162/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.29938 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -