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Client-pharmacy worker interactions regarding medical abortion in Zambia in 2009 and 2011.
Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2016 Feb; 132(2):214-8.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine sales practices, knowledge, and behavior of pharmacy workers regarding medical abortion in 2009 and 2011 in Zambia, where hostile and stigmatizing attitudes still result in high rates of unsafe abortion.

METHODS

Four mystery clients visited pharmacies during 2009 and 2011, and recorded their experiences following their interactions using a standardized form. Bivariate analysis examined pharmacy workers' attitudes, behavior, and medical abortion-dispensing practices.

RESULTS

Mystery clients visited 76 pharmacies in 2009 and 80 pharmacies in 2011. In 2011, mystery clients reported hostile interactions with pharmacy workers at 8 (10%) pharmacy visits, a relative decrease from 7 (22%) in 2009 (P=0.0353). In 2009, less than half (35 [46%]) of clients received information or had the opportunity to purchase medical abortion drugs in comparison with 53 (66%) in 2011 (P=0.0110). In 2011, more pharmacy workers mentioned a valid medical abortion drug in comparison with 2009 (42 [53%] vs 31 [41%], respectively); however, guidance for women on misoprostol use was minimal.

CONCLUSION

Pharmacy workers exhibited increased awareness of misoprostol, less hostility, and a willingness to sell medical abortion drugs; however, they continued to provide inadequate information on misoprostol for medical abortion. Effective training of pharmacy employees is vital in increasing access to safe induced-abortion care.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Ipas, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. Electronic address: Cheryl.j.hendrickson@gmail.com.Ipas, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.UNFPA, Lusaka, Zambia.University of Zambia at University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia.Ipas Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia.Ipas, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26604158

Citation

Hendrickson, Cheryl, et al. "Client-pharmacy Worker Interactions Regarding Medical Abortion in Zambia in 2009 and 2011." International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics: the Official Organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, vol. 132, no. 2, 2016, pp. 214-8.
Hendrickson C, Fetters T, Mupeta S, et al. Client-pharmacy worker interactions regarding medical abortion in Zambia in 2009 and 2011. Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2016;132(2):214-8.
Hendrickson, C., Fetters, T., Mupeta, S., Vwallika, B., Djemo, P., & Raisanen, K. (2016). Client-pharmacy worker interactions regarding medical abortion in Zambia in 2009 and 2011. International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics: the Official Organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, 132(2), 214-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijgo.2015.07.008
Hendrickson C, et al. Client-pharmacy Worker Interactions Regarding Medical Abortion in Zambia in 2009 and 2011. Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2016;132(2):214-8. PubMed PMID: 26604158.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Client-pharmacy worker interactions regarding medical abortion in Zambia in 2009 and 2011. AU - Hendrickson,Cheryl, AU - Fetters,Tamara, AU - Mupeta,Stephen, AU - Vwallika,Bellington, AU - Djemo,Patrick, AU - Raisanen,Keris, Y1 - 2015/10/23/ PY - 2014/07/23/received PY - 2015/06/29/revised PY - 2015/10/02/accepted PY - 2015/11/26/entrez PY - 2015/11/26/pubmed PY - 2016/11/5/medline KW - Abortion KW - Medical abortion KW - Misoprostol KW - Pharmacists KW - Pharmacy workers KW - Zambia SP - 214 EP - 8 JF - International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics: the official organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics JO - Int J Gynaecol Obstet VL - 132 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine sales practices, knowledge, and behavior of pharmacy workers regarding medical abortion in 2009 and 2011 in Zambia, where hostile and stigmatizing attitudes still result in high rates of unsafe abortion. METHODS: Four mystery clients visited pharmacies during 2009 and 2011, and recorded their experiences following their interactions using a standardized form. Bivariate analysis examined pharmacy workers' attitudes, behavior, and medical abortion-dispensing practices. RESULTS: Mystery clients visited 76 pharmacies in 2009 and 80 pharmacies in 2011. In 2011, mystery clients reported hostile interactions with pharmacy workers at 8 (10%) pharmacy visits, a relative decrease from 7 (22%) in 2009 (P=0.0353). In 2009, less than half (35 [46%]) of clients received information or had the opportunity to purchase medical abortion drugs in comparison with 53 (66%) in 2011 (P=0.0110). In 2011, more pharmacy workers mentioned a valid medical abortion drug in comparison with 2009 (42 [53%] vs 31 [41%], respectively); however, guidance for women on misoprostol use was minimal. CONCLUSION: Pharmacy workers exhibited increased awareness of misoprostol, less hostility, and a willingness to sell medical abortion drugs; however, they continued to provide inadequate information on misoprostol for medical abortion. Effective training of pharmacy employees is vital in increasing access to safe induced-abortion care. SN - 1879-3479 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26604158/Client_pharmacy_worker_interactions_regarding_medical_abortion_in_Zambia_in_2009_and_2011_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0020-7292(15)00633-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -