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Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Age-Related Macular Degeneration.
Ophthalmic Res 2015; 55(2):62-9OR

Abstract

Against a background of considerable epidemiological and other evidence implicating omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the negative results of the Age-Related Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) were unexpected. The possibility that the design, setting, intake or subjects of AREDS2 may not have permitted the prophylactic potential of omega-3 to be adequately demonstrated is considered. Epidemiological studies had indicated potential preventative effects of omega-3, and an earlier randomised prospective study (NAT2) showed that patients who achieved high red blood cell membrane EPA/DHA (eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid) levels were significantly protected against AMD compared with those with permanently low EPA/DHA levels. Various methodological differences between these studies are considered. NAT2 included a true placebo group, whereas control subjects in AREDS2 received a nutritional formula already found to be effective in AREDS1, but no placebo for DHA/EPA supplementation. Differences in the handling of non-compliant subjects and the formulation of the test formulations are considered. Given these considerations, and other lines of evidence from laboratory and clinical studies, closing the chapter on omega-3 in AMD prevention may be premature.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26610051

Citation

Souied, Eric H., et al. "Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Age-Related Macular Degeneration." Ophthalmic Research, vol. 55, no. 2, 2015, pp. 62-9.
Souied EH, Aslam T, Garcia-Layana A, et al. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Ophthalmic Res. 2015;55(2):62-9.
Souied, E. H., Aslam, T., Garcia-Layana, A., Holz, F. G., Leys, A., Silva, R., & Delcourt, C. (2015). Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Ophthalmic Research, 55(2), pp. 62-9. doi:10.1159/000441359.
Souied EH, et al. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Ophthalmic Res. 2015;55(2):62-9. PubMed PMID: 26610051.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Age-Related Macular Degeneration. AU - Souied,Eric H, AU - Aslam,Tariq, AU - Garcia-Layana,Alfredo, AU - Holz,Frank G, AU - Leys,Anita, AU - Silva,Rufino, AU - Delcourt,Cécile, Y1 - 2015/11/27/ PY - 2015/09/15/received PY - 2015/09/23/accepted PY - 2015/11/27/entrez PY - 2015/11/27/pubmed PY - 2016/7/14/medline SP - 62 EP - 9 JF - Ophthalmic research JO - Ophthalmic Res. VL - 55 IS - 2 N2 - Against a background of considerable epidemiological and other evidence implicating omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the negative results of the Age-Related Disease Study 2 (AREDS2) were unexpected. The possibility that the design, setting, intake or subjects of AREDS2 may not have permitted the prophylactic potential of omega-3 to be adequately demonstrated is considered. Epidemiological studies had indicated potential preventative effects of omega-3, and an earlier randomised prospective study (NAT2) showed that patients who achieved high red blood cell membrane EPA/DHA (eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid) levels were significantly protected against AMD compared with those with permanently low EPA/DHA levels. Various methodological differences between these studies are considered. NAT2 included a true placebo group, whereas control subjects in AREDS2 received a nutritional formula already found to be effective in AREDS1, but no placebo for DHA/EPA supplementation. Differences in the handling of non-compliant subjects and the formulation of the test formulations are considered. Given these considerations, and other lines of evidence from laboratory and clinical studies, closing the chapter on omega-3 in AMD prevention may be premature. SN - 1423-0259 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26610051/full_citation L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000441359 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -