Prime

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The long-term effects of school dropout and GED attainment on substance use disorders.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Epidemiologic research suggests that 14% of the population do not complete high school, and dropout has been linked to mental health conditions, substance use, chronic health problems, and criminal behavior. Few studies have assessed whether attainment of the general education development (GED) credential is protective from substance use.

PURPOSE

To assess the long-term outcomes of school dropout and GED attainment on past year substance use disorders, age of onset, and current smoking status.

METHODS

Longitudinal data were included for lifetime substance users who participated in the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (Waves I and II). Eligible participants (N=30,608) were classified as having completed high school, dropped out of high school and did not complete a GED, or completed GED at Wave I. Survey logistic regression analyses were used to determine whether high school graduation status was associated with substance use disorders and smoking at Wave II.

RESULTS

Multivariate results suggest that participants who dropped out of high school (OR=1.53; p<.01) or attained a GED were more likely to have a past year marijuana use disorder (OR=1.62 p<.01) compared to high school graduates. High school dropouts were also more likely to be current smokers (OR=1.88; p<.05) than graduates.

CONCLUSIONS

High school dropouts have higher long-term rates of marijuana use disorder and smoking in adulthood than graduates. Attainment of a GED does not appear to be protective from marijuana use disorders in adulthood.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, University of Texas School of Public Health, Dallas, TX, USA. Electronic address: Jennifer.reingle@utsouthwestern.edu.

    ,

    School of Social Work, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA. Electronic address: salaswright@utexas.edu.

    ,

    Program in Criminology, School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, USA. Electronic address: Nadine.connell@utdallas.edu.

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, University of Texas School of Public Health, Dallas, TX, USA. Electronic address: Katelyn.kassarjian@utsouthwestern.edu.

    ,

    Program in Criminology, School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, USA. Electronic address: Stephen.clipper@utdallas.edu.

    The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA. Electronic address: Michael.Businelle@utsouthwestern.edu.

    Source

    Drug and alcohol dependence 158: 2016 Jan 1 pg 60-6

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Educational Measurement
    Female
    Humans
    Longitudinal Studies
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Schools
    Smoking
    Student Dropouts
    Substance-Related Disorders
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Time Factors
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26613838

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - The long-term effects of school dropout and GED attainment on substance use disorders. AU - Reingle Gonzalez,Jennifer M, AU - Salas-Wright,Christopher P, AU - Connell,Nadine M, AU - Jetelina,Katelyn K, AU - Clipper,Stephen J, AU - Businelle,Michael S, Y1 - 2015/11/12/ PY - 2015/7/16/received PY - 2015/10/9/revised PY - 2015/11/2/accepted PY - 2015/11/12/aheadofprint PY - 2015/11/29/entrez PY - 2015/11/29/pubmed PY - 2016/8/19/medline KW - Alcohol KW - Dropout KW - GED KW - Substance use disorder KW - Tobacco SP - 60 EP - 6 JF - Drug and alcohol dependence JO - Drug Alcohol Depend VL - 158 N2 - BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic research suggests that 14% of the population do not complete high school, and dropout has been linked to mental health conditions, substance use, chronic health problems, and criminal behavior. Few studies have assessed whether attainment of the general education development (GED) credential is protective from substance use. PURPOSE: To assess the long-term outcomes of school dropout and GED attainment on past year substance use disorders, age of onset, and current smoking status. METHODS: Longitudinal data were included for lifetime substance users who participated in the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (Waves I and II). Eligible participants (N=30,608) were classified as having completed high school, dropped out of high school and did not complete a GED, or completed GED at Wave I. Survey logistic regression analyses were used to determine whether high school graduation status was associated with substance use disorders and smoking at Wave II. RESULTS: Multivariate results suggest that participants who dropped out of high school (OR=1.53; p<.01) or attained a GED were more likely to have a past year marijuana use disorder (OR=1.62 p<.01) compared to high school graduates. High school dropouts were also more likely to be current smokers (OR=1.88; p<.05) than graduates. CONCLUSIONS: High school dropouts have higher long-term rates of marijuana use disorder and smoking in adulthood than graduates. Attainment of a GED does not appear to be protective from marijuana use disorders in adulthood. SN - 1879-0046 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26613838/The_long_term_effects_of_school_dropout_and_GED_attainment_on_substance_use_disorders_ L2 - http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0376-8716(15)01730-5 ER -