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Identifying health problems and health research priorities in developing countries.
J Trop Med Hyg. 1989 Jun; 92(3):133-91.JT

Abstract

When we were invited to prepare this background paper on the health problems of the developing countries for the Commission on Health Research for Development, our first thought was to compile and organize available data on the causes of morbidity and mortality affecting different age groups in various populations. It soon became clear that this would not be especially useful. There are major gaps in the available data, particularly from the poorer countries and for people above 5 years of age. The data that are available are often of poor or uncertain quality, collected from unrepresentative or undefined subpopulations, and not strictly comparable due to different definitions and data-collection methods. Additionally, in the absence of agreed definitions and analytical frameworks, it is not clear what could or should be done with the data on health problems so amassed. More fundamentally, we have come to doubt whether the current array of epidemiological concepts and tools is sufficient for the task. We therefore decided that, while giving an overview of current knowledge on levels and trends of morbidity and mortality, the emphasis of this paper should be more towards concepts, methods, and data deficiencies. In Section 1, we set out definitions and frameworks for considering health problems and health research; we review recent conceptual models for the analysis of the determinants of child survival; and we outline a framework, focusing on modifiable determinants of health and life-cycle health effects, which is used in subsequent sections. In Section 2, relationships between national and societal level determinants and health are reviewed and then set aside. In Section 3, we review available data on world patterns and trends of morbidity and mortality, highlighting the data deficiencies and lacunae. In Section 4, we follow the life of a woman in a developing country and examine the health problems, and their determinants, which she and her children face. In Section 5, we draw these strands together and, having reviewed current approaches to prioritizing health problems and suggested some ways in which they could be improved, in Section 6 identify several research priorities, emphasizing the need for methodological research. This paper was commissioned in March 1987; prepared in draft and presented to a meeting at Chateau de Bossey, Geneva, Switzerland during 15-17 July; and revised and completed in September 1987. It is in no sense definitive or final.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2661849

Citation

Feachem, R G., et al. "Identifying Health Problems and Health Research Priorities in Developing Countries." The Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 92, no. 3, 1989, pp. 133-91.
Feachem RG, Graham WJ, Timaeus IM. Identifying health problems and health research priorities in developing countries. J Trop Med Hyg. 1989;92(3):133-91.
Feachem, R. G., Graham, W. J., & Timaeus, I. M. (1989). Identifying health problems and health research priorities in developing countries. The Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 92(3), 133-91.
Feachem RG, Graham WJ, Timaeus IM. Identifying Health Problems and Health Research Priorities in Developing Countries. J Trop Med Hyg. 1989;92(3):133-91. PubMed PMID: 2661849.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Identifying health problems and health research priorities in developing countries. AU - Feachem,R G, AU - Graham,W J, AU - Timaeus,I M, PY - 1989/6/1/pubmed PY - 1989/6/1/medline PY - 1989/6/1/entrez KW - Action Research KW - Causes Of Death KW - Delivery Of Health Care KW - Demographic Analysis KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - Diarrhea KW - Diseases KW - Economic Factors KW - Epidemiologic Methods KW - Health KW - Health Services Evaluation KW - Morbidity KW - Mortality KW - Organization And Administration KW - Population KW - Population Dynamics KW - Program Evaluation KW - Programs KW - Research Methodology KW - Socioeconomic Factors KW - Women's Status SP - 133 EP - 91 JF - The Journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - J Trop Med Hyg VL - 92 IS - 3 N2 - When we were invited to prepare this background paper on the health problems of the developing countries for the Commission on Health Research for Development, our first thought was to compile and organize available data on the causes of morbidity and mortality affecting different age groups in various populations. It soon became clear that this would not be especially useful. There are major gaps in the available data, particularly from the poorer countries and for people above 5 years of age. The data that are available are often of poor or uncertain quality, collected from unrepresentative or undefined subpopulations, and not strictly comparable due to different definitions and data-collection methods. Additionally, in the absence of agreed definitions and analytical frameworks, it is not clear what could or should be done with the data on health problems so amassed. More fundamentally, we have come to doubt whether the current array of epidemiological concepts and tools is sufficient for the task. We therefore decided that, while giving an overview of current knowledge on levels and trends of morbidity and mortality, the emphasis of this paper should be more towards concepts, methods, and data deficiencies. In Section 1, we set out definitions and frameworks for considering health problems and health research; we review recent conceptual models for the analysis of the determinants of child survival; and we outline a framework, focusing on modifiable determinants of health and life-cycle health effects, which is used in subsequent sections. In Section 2, relationships between national and societal level determinants and health are reviewed and then set aside. In Section 3, we review available data on world patterns and trends of morbidity and mortality, highlighting the data deficiencies and lacunae. In Section 4, we follow the life of a woman in a developing country and examine the health problems, and their determinants, which she and her children face. In Section 5, we draw these strands together and, having reviewed current approaches to prioritizing health problems and suggested some ways in which they could be improved, in Section 6 identify several research priorities, emphasizing the need for methodological research. This paper was commissioned in March 1987; prepared in draft and presented to a meeting at Chateau de Bossey, Geneva, Switzerland during 15-17 July; and revised and completed in September 1987. It is in no sense definitive or final.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) SN - 0022-5304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2661849/Identifying_health_problems_and_health_research_priorities_in_developing_countries_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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