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Obstacle crossing in 7-9-year-old children with Down syndrome.
Res Dev Disabil 2016; 48:202-10RD

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate obstacle crossing in 7-9-year-old children with Down syndrome (DS). Fifteen children with DS, age- and gender-matched with 15 typically developing (TD) children, were recruited to walk and cross obstacles with heights of 10%, 20% and 30% of their leg lengths. End-point and kinematic variables of obstacle crossing were obtained using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. The results showed that children with DS tend to adopt a lower speed and larger step width when they perceive instability. Moreover, unlike TD children, children with DS adopt a pelvic strategy (i.e., greater pelvic leading-side listing and forward rotation) to achieve a higher leading toe clearance with a longer step length, presumably for safety reasons. This pelvic strategy increased the frontal plane motion of the whole leg and trunk, and thus possibly stability, during obstacle crossing. However, this strategy may be inefficient. Trailing toe clearance did not differ significantly between two groups. The results of this study suggest that children with DS tend to use inefficient and conservative strategies for obstacle crossing. Knowledge of both end-point and kinematic control of obstacle crossing in children with DS is useful for understanding the mechanisms of obstacle-related falls. Moreover, obstacle crossing can be used as a task-oriented rehabilitation program for children with DS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University and Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: hlchen@ntu.edu.tw.School of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Taoyuan Armed Forces General Hospital, Taoyuan County, Taiwan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26619373

Citation

Chen, Hao-Ling, et al. "Obstacle Crossing in 7-9-year-old Children With Down Syndrome." Research in Developmental Disabilities, vol. 48, 2016, pp. 202-10.
Chen HL, Yu WH, Yeh HC. Obstacle crossing in 7-9-year-old children with Down syndrome. Res Dev Disabil. 2016;48:202-10.
Chen, H. L., Yu, W. H., & Yeh, H. C. (2016). Obstacle crossing in 7-9-year-old children with Down syndrome. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 48, pp. 202-10. doi:10.1016/j.ridd.2015.11.004.
Chen HL, Yu WH, Yeh HC. Obstacle Crossing in 7-9-year-old Children With Down Syndrome. Res Dev Disabil. 2016;48:202-10. PubMed PMID: 26619373.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Obstacle crossing in 7-9-year-old children with Down syndrome. AU - Chen,Hao-Ling, AU - Yu,Wan-Hui, AU - Yeh,Hsiu-Chen, Y1 - 2015/12/07/ PY - 2014/12/05/received PY - 2015/11/09/revised PY - 2015/11/09/accepted PY - 2015/12/1/entrez PY - 2015/12/1/pubmed PY - 2016/10/1/medline KW - Children KW - Down syndrome KW - Gait KW - Kinematics KW - Obstacle SP - 202 EP - 10 JF - Research in developmental disabilities JO - Res Dev Disabil VL - 48 N2 - This study aimed to investigate obstacle crossing in 7-9-year-old children with Down syndrome (DS). Fifteen children with DS, age- and gender-matched with 15 typically developing (TD) children, were recruited to walk and cross obstacles with heights of 10%, 20% and 30% of their leg lengths. End-point and kinematic variables of obstacle crossing were obtained using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. The results showed that children with DS tend to adopt a lower speed and larger step width when they perceive instability. Moreover, unlike TD children, children with DS adopt a pelvic strategy (i.e., greater pelvic leading-side listing and forward rotation) to achieve a higher leading toe clearance with a longer step length, presumably for safety reasons. This pelvic strategy increased the frontal plane motion of the whole leg and trunk, and thus possibly stability, during obstacle crossing. However, this strategy may be inefficient. Trailing toe clearance did not differ significantly between two groups. The results of this study suggest that children with DS tend to use inefficient and conservative strategies for obstacle crossing. Knowledge of both end-point and kinematic control of obstacle crossing in children with DS is useful for understanding the mechanisms of obstacle-related falls. Moreover, obstacle crossing can be used as a task-oriented rehabilitation program for children with DS. SN - 1873-3379 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26619373/Obstacle_crossing_in_7-9-year-old_children_with_Down_syndrome L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0891-4222(15)00208-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -