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Angiostrongylus cantonensis in the vector snails Pomacea canaliculata and Achatina fulica in China: a meta-analysis.
Parasitol Res. 2016 Mar; 115(3):913-23.PR

Abstract

Angiostrongyliasis is a food-borne parasitic disease induced by the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis, and has been recognized as the main cause leading to human eosinophilic meningitis. Humans usually acquire infection by digestion of infected Pomacea canaliculata and Achatina fulica, the most predominant intermediate hosts found in China. This meta-analysis was aimed to assess the prevalence of A. cantonensis infection among these two snails in China in the past 10 years. Data were systematically collected in electronic databases such as PubMed, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, CNKI, SinoMed, VIP, CSCD, and Wanfang from 2005 to 2015. Thirty-eight studies with a total of 41,299 P. canaliculata and 21,138 Ac. fulica were included in the present study. The overall infection rate of A. cantonensis in China was estimated to be 7.6 % (95 % confidential interval (CI) = 0.063 to 0.090) in P. canaliculata and 21.5 % in Ac. fulica (95 % CI = 0.184 to 0.245), respectively. No significant difference was observed in prevalence rates among publication year and sample size for both snails. Also, it was found that the prevalence in Ac. fulica is significantly higher than that in P. canaliculata (odds ratio (OR) = 3.946, 95 % CI = 3.070 to 5.073). The present study reveals that snail infection with A. cantonensis is clearly prevalent in China. Further studies are required to improve strategies for control of infections of snails, particularly those of Ac. fulica, and to detect further factors and conditions such as geographic region, temperatures, and diagnosis method.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Parasitology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510060, China. songlg@mail2.sysu.edu.cn. Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control, Ministry of Education, Guangzhou, 510080, China. songlg@mail2.sysu.edu.cn.School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510060, China. wangxw35@mail.sysu.edu.cn.School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510060, China. vivienbritney@live.cn.Department of Parasitology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510060, China. lvzhiyue@mail.sysu.edu.cn. Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control, Ministry of Education, Guangzhou, 510080, China. lvzhiyue@mail.sysu.edu.cn.Department of Parasitology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510060, China. wzhd@mail.sysu.edu.cn. Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control, Ministry of Education, Guangzhou, 510080, China. wzhd@mail.sysu.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26621284

Citation

Song, Langui, et al. "Angiostrongylus Cantonensis in the Vector Snails Pomacea Canaliculata and Achatina Fulica in China: a Meta-analysis." Parasitology Research, vol. 115, no. 3, 2016, pp. 913-23.
Song L, Wang X, Yang Z, et al. Angiostrongylus cantonensis in the vector snails Pomacea canaliculata and Achatina fulica in China: a meta-analysis. Parasitol Res. 2016;115(3):913-23.
Song, L., Wang, X., Yang, Z., Lv, Z., & Wu, Z. (2016). Angiostrongylus cantonensis in the vector snails Pomacea canaliculata and Achatina fulica in China: a meta-analysis. Parasitology Research, 115(3), 913-23. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00436-015-4849-5
Song L, et al. Angiostrongylus Cantonensis in the Vector Snails Pomacea Canaliculata and Achatina Fulica in China: a Meta-analysis. Parasitol Res. 2016;115(3):913-23. PubMed PMID: 26621284.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Angiostrongylus cantonensis in the vector snails Pomacea canaliculata and Achatina fulica in China: a meta-analysis. AU - Song,Langui, AU - Wang,Xiaowen, AU - Yang,Zi, AU - Lv,Zhiyue, AU - Wu,Zhongdao, Y1 - 2015/12/01/ PY - 2015/11/14/received PY - 2015/11/20/accepted PY - 2015/12/2/entrez PY - 2015/12/2/pubmed PY - 2016/10/25/medline KW - Achatina fulica KW - Angiostrongylus cantonensis KW - Infection rates KW - Meta-analysis of occurrence KW - Pomacea canaliculata SP - 913 EP - 23 JF - Parasitology research JO - Parasitol Res VL - 115 IS - 3 N2 - Angiostrongyliasis is a food-borne parasitic disease induced by the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis, and has been recognized as the main cause leading to human eosinophilic meningitis. Humans usually acquire infection by digestion of infected Pomacea canaliculata and Achatina fulica, the most predominant intermediate hosts found in China. This meta-analysis was aimed to assess the prevalence of A. cantonensis infection among these two snails in China in the past 10 years. Data were systematically collected in electronic databases such as PubMed, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, CNKI, SinoMed, VIP, CSCD, and Wanfang from 2005 to 2015. Thirty-eight studies with a total of 41,299 P. canaliculata and 21,138 Ac. fulica were included in the present study. The overall infection rate of A. cantonensis in China was estimated to be 7.6 % (95 % confidential interval (CI) = 0.063 to 0.090) in P. canaliculata and 21.5 % in Ac. fulica (95 % CI = 0.184 to 0.245), respectively. No significant difference was observed in prevalence rates among publication year and sample size for both snails. Also, it was found that the prevalence in Ac. fulica is significantly higher than that in P. canaliculata (odds ratio (OR) = 3.946, 95 % CI = 3.070 to 5.073). The present study reveals that snail infection with A. cantonensis is clearly prevalent in China. Further studies are required to improve strategies for control of infections of snails, particularly those of Ac. fulica, and to detect further factors and conditions such as geographic region, temperatures, and diagnosis method. SN - 1432-1955 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26621284/Angiostrongylus_cantonensis_in_the_vector_snails_Pomacea_canaliculata_and_Achatina_fulica_in_China:_a_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-015-4849-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -