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Thymus Activity, Vitamin D, and Respiratory Infections in Adolescent Swimmers.
Isr Med Assoc J 2015; 17(9):571-5IM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Several studies have identified associations between low vitamin D concentrations and risk of upper respiratory infections (URI). T lymphocytes have a major anti-viral role, are affected by vitamin D metabolism, and may mediate the link between vitamin D and URIs. Competitive swimmers have a relatively high rate of URIs, alongside a high prevalence of low vitamin D concentration.

OBJECTIVES

To examine the associations linking T cell receptor excision circles (TREC, markers of thymus activity), circulating 25(OH)D concentrations and the effect of vitamin D supplementation, and URI symptoms in young competitive swimmers.

METHODS

We tested 82 adolescent swimmers for serum 25(OH)D and TREC concentrations and found that 55 had vitamin D insufficiency. Randomized supplementation of either vitamin D3 or placebo was given for 12 winter weeks. URI symptoms were recorded weekly. The associations between TREC copy numbers, vitamin D and URI burden were examined.

RESULTS

TREC concentrations decreased with the participants' age (r = -0.346, P = 0.003), with no significant between-gender difference. TREC concentrations did not materially differ among subjects with normal, insufficient or deficient vitamin D status, and were not affected by vitamin D supplementation. No significant correlations were found between TREC levels or their changes during the study period, and mean URI severity or duration.

CONCLUSIONS

Thymus activity, represented by higher TREC levels, was not related to vitamin D concentrations or status, and was not affected by vitamin D supplementation in adolescent swimmers. TREC concentrations were not associated with URI severity or duration in this population.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26625549

Citation

Mayan, Inbal, et al. "Thymus Activity, Vitamin D, and Respiratory Infections in Adolescent Swimmers." The Israel Medical Association Journal : IMAJ, vol. 17, no. 9, 2015, pp. 571-5.
Mayan I, Somech R, Lev A, et al. Thymus Activity, Vitamin D, and Respiratory Infections in Adolescent Swimmers. Isr Med Assoc J. 2015;17(9):571-5.
Mayan, I., Somech, R., Lev, A., Cohen, A. H., Constantini, N. W., & Dubnov-Raz, G. (2015). Thymus Activity, Vitamin D, and Respiratory Infections in Adolescent Swimmers. The Israel Medical Association Journal : IMAJ, 17(9), pp. 571-5.
Mayan I, et al. Thymus Activity, Vitamin D, and Respiratory Infections in Adolescent Swimmers. Isr Med Assoc J. 2015;17(9):571-5. PubMed PMID: 26625549.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Thymus Activity, Vitamin D, and Respiratory Infections in Adolescent Swimmers. AU - Mayan,Inbal, AU - Somech,Raz, AU - Lev,Atar, AU - Cohen,Avner H, AU - Constantini,Naama W, AU - Dubnov-Raz,Gal, PY - 2015/12/3/entrez PY - 2015/12/3/pubmed PY - 2015/12/23/medline SP - 571 EP - 5 JF - The Israel Medical Association journal : IMAJ JO - Isr. Med. Assoc. J. VL - 17 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Several studies have identified associations between low vitamin D concentrations and risk of upper respiratory infections (URI). T lymphocytes have a major anti-viral role, are affected by vitamin D metabolism, and may mediate the link between vitamin D and URIs. Competitive swimmers have a relatively high rate of URIs, alongside a high prevalence of low vitamin D concentration. OBJECTIVES: To examine the associations linking T cell receptor excision circles (TREC, markers of thymus activity), circulating 25(OH)D concentrations and the effect of vitamin D supplementation, and URI symptoms in young competitive swimmers. METHODS: We tested 82 adolescent swimmers for serum 25(OH)D and TREC concentrations and found that 55 had vitamin D insufficiency. Randomized supplementation of either vitamin D3 or placebo was given for 12 winter weeks. URI symptoms were recorded weekly. The associations between TREC copy numbers, vitamin D and URI burden were examined. RESULTS: TREC concentrations decreased with the participants' age (r = -0.346, P = 0.003), with no significant between-gender difference. TREC concentrations did not materially differ among subjects with normal, insufficient or deficient vitamin D status, and were not affected by vitamin D supplementation. No significant correlations were found between TREC levels or their changes during the study period, and mean URI severity or duration. CONCLUSIONS: Thymus activity, represented by higher TREC levels, was not related to vitamin D concentrations or status, and was not affected by vitamin D supplementation in adolescent swimmers. TREC concentrations were not associated with URI severity or duration in this population. SN - 1565-1088 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26625549/Thymus_Activity_Vitamin_D_and_Respiratory_Infections_in_Adolescent_Swimmers_ L2 - http://www.ima.org.il/IMAJ/ViewArticle.aspx?year=2015&month=09&page=571 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -