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The Influence on Population Weight Gain and Obesity of the Macronutrient Composition and Energy Density of the Food Supply.
Curr Obes Rep. 2015 Mar; 4(1):1-10.CO

Abstract

Rates of overweight and obesity have increased dramatically in all regions of the world over the last few decades. Almost all of the world's population now has ubiquitous access to low-cost, but highly-processed, energy-dense, nutrient-poor food products. These changes in the food supply, rather than decreases in physical activity, are most likely the primary driver of population weight gain and obesity. To-date, the majority of prevention efforts focus on personalised approaches targeting individuals. Population-wide food supply interventions addressing sodium and trans fat reduction have proven highly effective and comparable efforts are now required to target obesity. The evidence suggests that strategies focusing upon reducing the energy density and portion size of foods will be more effective than those targeting specific macronutrients. Government leadership, clearly specified targets, accountability and transparency will be the key to achieving the food supply changes required to address the global obesity epidemic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Level 10, King George V Building, 83-117 Missenden Rd, Camperdown, NSW, 2050, Sydney, Australia. mcrino@georgeinstitute.org.au.WHO Collaborating Centre for Obesity Prevention, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, VIC, 3125, Australia. gary.sacks@deakin.edu.au.School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland Mail Centre, Auckland, 1142, New Zealand. s.vandevijvere@auckland.ac.nz.WHO Collaborating Centre for Obesity Prevention, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, VIC, 3125, Australia. boyd.swinburn@auckland.ac.nz. School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland Mail Centre, Auckland, 1142, New Zealand. boyd.swinburn@auckland.ac.nz.The George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Level 10, King George V Building, 83-117 Missenden Rd, Camperdown, NSW, 2050, Sydney, Australia. bneal@georgeinstitute.org.au. The Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Australia. bneal@georgeinstitute.org.au. Imperial College, London, UK. bneal@georgeinstitute.org.au.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26627085

Citation

Crino, Michelle, et al. "The Influence On Population Weight Gain and Obesity of the Macronutrient Composition and Energy Density of the Food Supply." Current Obesity Reports, vol. 4, no. 1, 2015, pp. 1-10.
Crino M, Sacks G, Vandevijvere S, et al. The Influence on Population Weight Gain and Obesity of the Macronutrient Composition and Energy Density of the Food Supply. Curr Obes Rep. 2015;4(1):1-10.
Crino, M., Sacks, G., Vandevijvere, S., Swinburn, B., & Neal, B. (2015). The Influence on Population Weight Gain and Obesity of the Macronutrient Composition and Energy Density of the Food Supply. Current Obesity Reports, 4(1), 1-10. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13679-014-0134-7
Crino M, et al. The Influence On Population Weight Gain and Obesity of the Macronutrient Composition and Energy Density of the Food Supply. Curr Obes Rep. 2015;4(1):1-10. PubMed PMID: 26627085.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Influence on Population Weight Gain and Obesity of the Macronutrient Composition and Energy Density of the Food Supply. AU - Crino,Michelle, AU - Sacks,Gary, AU - Vandevijvere,Stefanie, AU - Swinburn,Boyd, AU - Neal,Bruce, PY - 2015/12/3/entrez PY - 2015/12/3/pubmed PY - 2016/9/15/medline KW - Energy density KW - Food supply KW - Macronutrient composition KW - Nutrition transition KW - Obesity KW - Ultra-processed food products SP - 1 EP - 10 JF - Current obesity reports JO - Curr Obes Rep VL - 4 IS - 1 N2 - Rates of overweight and obesity have increased dramatically in all regions of the world over the last few decades. Almost all of the world's population now has ubiquitous access to low-cost, but highly-processed, energy-dense, nutrient-poor food products. These changes in the food supply, rather than decreases in physical activity, are most likely the primary driver of population weight gain and obesity. To-date, the majority of prevention efforts focus on personalised approaches targeting individuals. Population-wide food supply interventions addressing sodium and trans fat reduction have proven highly effective and comparable efforts are now required to target obesity. The evidence suggests that strategies focusing upon reducing the energy density and portion size of foods will be more effective than those targeting specific macronutrients. Government leadership, clearly specified targets, accountability and transparency will be the key to achieving the food supply changes required to address the global obesity epidemic. SN - 2162-4968 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26627085/The_Influence_on_Population_Weight_Gain_and_Obesity_of_the_Macronutrient_Composition_and_Energy_Density_of_the_Food_Supply_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13679-014-0134-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -