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A comparative study of the feet of middle-aged women in Korea and the Maasai tribe.
J Foot Ankle Res. 2015; 8:68.JF

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Members of the Maasai tribe spend their days either barefoot or wearing traditional shoes made from recycled car tires. Although they walk long distances (up to 60 km) daily, they do not generally experience foot ailments. Here, we compared parameters associated with the feet, ankles, and gait of middle-aged women in Korea and the Maasai tribe.

METHODS

Foot length, calf circumference, hindfoot alignment, step length, cadence, and walking velocity were compared among 20 middle-aged Korean and bush-living Maasai women. Static and dynamic Harris mat footprints were taken to determine the distribution of forefoot pressure patterns during walking. We also compared several radiographic parameters with standing foot and ankle radiographs.

RESULTS

The mean foot length and width were significantly longer in Maasai women. Interestingly, 38 ft (96 %) in the Maasai group showed a claw deformity of the toe (s). There were no statistically significant differences in gait-related indices and Harris mat findings between the two groups. On radiographic analysis, tibial anterior surface angle, tibial lateral surface angle, talonavicular coverage angle, talo-first metatarsal angle, Meary angle, and naviculo-cuboidal overlap were significantly greater in the Maasai group, whereas hallux valgus angle and the first and second intermetatarsal angle were greater in the Korean group.

CONCLUSIONS

Middle-aged women from the Maasai tribe showed a higher prevalence of abducted forefeet, everted hindfeet, and fallen medial longitudinal arches than did Korean women, while Korean women showed a higher prevalence of hallux valgus, a preserved medial longitudinal arch, and toes that are free from claw deformity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

W Institute for Foot and Ankle Disease & Trauma, W Hospital, 101-6, Gamsam-dong, Dalseo-gu, Daegu South Korea.W Institute for Foot and Ankle Disease & Trauma, W Hospital, 101-6, Gamsam-dong, Dalseo-gu, Daegu South Korea.Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, 170 Juhwa-ro, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do South Korea.Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, 170 Juhwa-ro, Ilsanseo-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do South Korea.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26628924

Citation

Choi, Jun Young, et al. "A Comparative Study of the Feet of Middle-aged Women in Korea and the Maasai Tribe." Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, vol. 8, 2015, p. 68.
Choi JY, Woo SH, Oh SH, et al. A comparative study of the feet of middle-aged women in Korea and the Maasai tribe. J Foot Ankle Res. 2015;8:68.
Choi, J. Y., Woo, S. H., Oh, S. H., & Suh, J. S. (2015). A comparative study of the feet of middle-aged women in Korea and the Maasai tribe. Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, 8, 68. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13047-015-0126-1
Choi JY, et al. A Comparative Study of the Feet of Middle-aged Women in Korea and the Maasai Tribe. J Foot Ankle Res. 2015;8:68. PubMed PMID: 26628924.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A comparative study of the feet of middle-aged women in Korea and the Maasai tribe. AU - Choi,Jun Young, AU - Woo,Sang Hyun, AU - Oh,Sang Hyun, AU - Suh,Jin Soo, Y1 - 2015/12/01/ PY - 2015/08/04/received PY - 2015/11/19/accepted PY - 2015/12/3/entrez PY - 2015/12/3/pubmed PY - 2015/12/3/medline KW - Barefoot KW - Maasai KW - Maasai foot KW - Unshod foot SP - 68 EP - 68 JF - Journal of foot and ankle research JO - J Foot Ankle Res VL - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Members of the Maasai tribe spend their days either barefoot or wearing traditional shoes made from recycled car tires. Although they walk long distances (up to 60 km) daily, they do not generally experience foot ailments. Here, we compared parameters associated with the feet, ankles, and gait of middle-aged women in Korea and the Maasai tribe. METHODS: Foot length, calf circumference, hindfoot alignment, step length, cadence, and walking velocity were compared among 20 middle-aged Korean and bush-living Maasai women. Static and dynamic Harris mat footprints were taken to determine the distribution of forefoot pressure patterns during walking. We also compared several radiographic parameters with standing foot and ankle radiographs. RESULTS: The mean foot length and width were significantly longer in Maasai women. Interestingly, 38 ft (96 %) in the Maasai group showed a claw deformity of the toe (s). There were no statistically significant differences in gait-related indices and Harris mat findings between the two groups. On radiographic analysis, tibial anterior surface angle, tibial lateral surface angle, talonavicular coverage angle, talo-first metatarsal angle, Meary angle, and naviculo-cuboidal overlap were significantly greater in the Maasai group, whereas hallux valgus angle and the first and second intermetatarsal angle were greater in the Korean group. CONCLUSIONS: Middle-aged women from the Maasai tribe showed a higher prevalence of abducted forefeet, everted hindfeet, and fallen medial longitudinal arches than did Korean women, while Korean women showed a higher prevalence of hallux valgus, a preserved medial longitudinal arch, and toes that are free from claw deformity. SN - 1757-1146 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26628924/A_comparative_study_of_the_feet_of_middle_aged_women_in_Korea_and_the_Maasai_tribe_ L2 - https://jfootankleres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13047-015-0126-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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