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Inhibitory Control of Spanish-Speaking Language-Minority Preschool Children: Measurement and Association With Language, Literacy, and Math Skills.
J Learn Disabil. 2017 Jul/Aug; 50(4):373-385.JL

Abstract

Children's self-regulation, including components of executive function such as inhibitory control, is related concurrently and longitudinally with elementary school children's reading and math abilities. Although several recent studies have examined links between preschool children's self-regulation or executive function and their academic skill development, few included large numbers of Spanish-speaking language-minority children. Among the fastest growing segments of the U.S. school-age population, many of these children are at significant risk of academic difficulties. We examined the relations between inhibitory control and academic skills in a sample containing a large number of Spanish-speaking preschoolers. Overall, the children demonstrated substantial academic risk based on preschool-entry vocabulary scores in the below-average range. Children completed assessments of language, literacy, and math skills in English and Spanish, when appropriate, at the start and end of their preschool year, along with a measure of inhibitory control, the Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders task, which was administered at the start of the preschool year in the child's dominant conversational language. Scores on this last measure were lower for children for whom it was administered in Spanish. For both English and Spanish outcomes, those scores were significantly and uniquely associated with higher scores on measures of phonological awareness and math skills but not vocabulary or print knowledge skills.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Florida State University, Tallahassee, USA.1 Florida State University, Tallahassee, USA.1 Florida State University, Tallahassee, USA.1 Florida State University, Tallahassee, USA.1 Florida State University, Tallahassee, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26631366

Citation

Lonigan, Christopher J., et al. "Inhibitory Control of Spanish-Speaking Language-Minority Preschool Children: Measurement and Association With Language, Literacy, and Math Skills." Journal of Learning Disabilities, vol. 50, no. 4, 2017, pp. 373-385.
Lonigan CJ, Allan DM, Goodrich JM, et al. Inhibitory Control of Spanish-Speaking Language-Minority Preschool Children: Measurement and Association With Language, Literacy, and Math Skills. J Learn Disabil. 2017;50(4):373-385.
Lonigan, C. J., Allan, D. M., Goodrich, J. M., Farrington, A. L., & Phillips, B. M. (2017). Inhibitory Control of Spanish-Speaking Language-Minority Preschool Children: Measurement and Association With Language, Literacy, and Math Skills. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 50(4), 373-385. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022219415618498
Lonigan CJ, et al. Inhibitory Control of Spanish-Speaking Language-Minority Preschool Children: Measurement and Association With Language, Literacy, and Math Skills. J Learn Disabil. 2017 Jul/Aug;50(4):373-385. PubMed PMID: 26631366.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Inhibitory Control of Spanish-Speaking Language-Minority Preschool Children: Measurement and Association With Language, Literacy, and Math Skills. AU - Lonigan,Christopher J, AU - Allan,Darcey M, AU - Goodrich,J Marc, AU - Farrington,Amber L, AU - Phillips,Beth M, Y1 - 2015/12/02/ PY - 2015/12/4/pubmed PY - 2018/3/31/medline PY - 2015/12/4/entrez KW - Spanish-speaking preschoolers KW - academic skills KW - executive functions KW - inhibitory control KW - self-regulation SP - 373 EP - 385 JF - Journal of learning disabilities JO - J Learn Disabil VL - 50 IS - 4 N2 - Children's self-regulation, including components of executive function such as inhibitory control, is related concurrently and longitudinally with elementary school children's reading and math abilities. Although several recent studies have examined links between preschool children's self-regulation or executive function and their academic skill development, few included large numbers of Spanish-speaking language-minority children. Among the fastest growing segments of the U.S. school-age population, many of these children are at significant risk of academic difficulties. We examined the relations between inhibitory control and academic skills in a sample containing a large number of Spanish-speaking preschoolers. Overall, the children demonstrated substantial academic risk based on preschool-entry vocabulary scores in the below-average range. Children completed assessments of language, literacy, and math skills in English and Spanish, when appropriate, at the start and end of their preschool year, along with a measure of inhibitory control, the Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders task, which was administered at the start of the preschool year in the child's dominant conversational language. Scores on this last measure were lower for children for whom it was administered in Spanish. For both English and Spanish outcomes, those scores were significantly and uniquely associated with higher scores on measures of phonological awareness and math skills but not vocabulary or print knowledge skills. SN - 1538-4780 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26631366/Inhibitory_Control_of_Spanish_Speaking_Language_Minority_Preschool_Children:_Measurement_and_Association_With_Language_Literacy_and_Math_Skills_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0022219415618498?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -