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Suicidal ideation, suicide attempts and non-suicidal self-injury among lesbian, gay, bisexual and heterosexual adults: Findings from an Australian national study.
Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2016 Feb; 50(2):145-53.AN

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

This study investigated associations between sexual orientation and measures of suicidality and non-suicidal self-injury in Australian adults. Previous studies of sexual orientation and suicidality have been limited by unclear conceptualisations of suicidal intent, failure to differentiate between homosexuality and bisexuality, inattention to gender differences and use of convenience-based samples.

METHODS

A large (N = 10,531) representative national sample of Australian adults was used to investigate associations between sexual orientation (heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual) and (1) suicidal ideation, (2) attempted suicide and (3) non-suicidal self-injury, for males and females separately, in a series of sequentially adjusted logistic regression models.

RESULTS

Sexual minority participants were at greater risk of suicidality and self-injury than heterosexuals, after adjusting for age and other covariates, with patterns of risk differing by sexual orientation and gender. Compared with their heterosexual counterparts, gay men, but not bisexual men, were more likely to report suicidal ideation (odds ratio = 3.05, 95% confidence interval = [1.65, 5.60]) and suicide attempts (odds ratio = 4.16, confidence interval = [2.18, 7.93]). Bisexual women, but not lesbian women, were more likely to report suicidal ideation (odds ratio = 4.40, confidence interval = [3.00, 6.37]) and suicide attempts (odds ratio = 4.46, confidence interval = [2.41, 8.24]). Neither bisexual nor gay men were more likely than heterosexual men to report self-injury. However, bisexual women, but not lesbian women, were more likely than heterosexual women to report self-injury (odds ratio = 19.59, confidence interval = [9.05, 42.40]). Overall, bisexual females were at greatest risk of suicidality and self-injury.

CONCLUSION

Clinicians working with sexual minority populations are encouraged to openly discuss suicidal and self-injurious thoughts and behaviours with their clients and may consider using therapeutic strategies to reduce internalised stigma and enhance personal and social resources.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Discipline of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Herston, QLD, Australia.Discipline of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Herston, QLD, Australia.Centre for Health Research, School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, NSW, Australia a.page@westernsydney.edu.au.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26631718

Citation

Swannell, Sarah, et al. "Suicidal Ideation, Suicide Attempts and Non-suicidal Self-injury Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Heterosexual Adults: Findings From an Australian National Study." The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 50, no. 2, 2016, pp. 145-53.
Swannell S, Martin G, Page A. Suicidal ideation, suicide attempts and non-suicidal self-injury among lesbian, gay, bisexual and heterosexual adults: Findings from an Australian national study. Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2016;50(2):145-53.
Swannell, S., Martin, G., & Page, A. (2016). Suicidal ideation, suicide attempts and non-suicidal self-injury among lesbian, gay, bisexual and heterosexual adults: Findings from an Australian national study. The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 50(2), 145-53. https://doi.org/10.1177/0004867415615949
Swannell S, Martin G, Page A. Suicidal Ideation, Suicide Attempts and Non-suicidal Self-injury Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Heterosexual Adults: Findings From an Australian National Study. Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2016;50(2):145-53. PubMed PMID: 26631718.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Suicidal ideation, suicide attempts and non-suicidal self-injury among lesbian, gay, bisexual and heterosexual adults: Findings from an Australian national study. AU - Swannell,Sarah, AU - Martin,Graham, AU - Page,Andrew, Y1 - 2015/12/01/ PY - 2015/12/4/entrez PY - 2015/12/4/pubmed PY - 2016/10/19/medline KW - Homosexuality KW - bisexuality KW - non-suicidal self-injury KW - sexual orientation KW - suicidal ideation SP - 145 EP - 53 JF - The Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry JO - Aust N Z J Psychiatry VL - 50 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: This study investigated associations between sexual orientation and measures of suicidality and non-suicidal self-injury in Australian adults. Previous studies of sexual orientation and suicidality have been limited by unclear conceptualisations of suicidal intent, failure to differentiate between homosexuality and bisexuality, inattention to gender differences and use of convenience-based samples. METHODS: A large (N = 10,531) representative national sample of Australian adults was used to investigate associations between sexual orientation (heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual) and (1) suicidal ideation, (2) attempted suicide and (3) non-suicidal self-injury, for males and females separately, in a series of sequentially adjusted logistic regression models. RESULTS: Sexual minority participants were at greater risk of suicidality and self-injury than heterosexuals, after adjusting for age and other covariates, with patterns of risk differing by sexual orientation and gender. Compared with their heterosexual counterparts, gay men, but not bisexual men, were more likely to report suicidal ideation (odds ratio = 3.05, 95% confidence interval = [1.65, 5.60]) and suicide attempts (odds ratio = 4.16, confidence interval = [2.18, 7.93]). Bisexual women, but not lesbian women, were more likely to report suicidal ideation (odds ratio = 4.40, confidence interval = [3.00, 6.37]) and suicide attempts (odds ratio = 4.46, confidence interval = [2.41, 8.24]). Neither bisexual nor gay men were more likely than heterosexual men to report self-injury. However, bisexual women, but not lesbian women, were more likely than heterosexual women to report self-injury (odds ratio = 19.59, confidence interval = [9.05, 42.40]). Overall, bisexual females were at greatest risk of suicidality and self-injury. CONCLUSION: Clinicians working with sexual minority populations are encouraged to openly discuss suicidal and self-injurious thoughts and behaviours with their clients and may consider using therapeutic strategies to reduce internalised stigma and enhance personal and social resources. SN - 1440-1614 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26631718/Suicidal_ideation_suicide_attempts_and_non_suicidal_self_injury_among_lesbian_gay_bisexual_and_heterosexual_adults:_Findings_from_an_Australian_national_study_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0004867415615949?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -