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Vascular mTOR-dependent mechanisms linking the control of aging to Alzheimer's disease.
Biochim Biophys Acta 2016; 1862(5):992-1007BB

Abstract

Aging is the strongest known risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). With the discovery of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) as a critical pathway controlling the rate of aging in mice, molecules at the interface between the regulation of aging and the mechanisms of specific age-associated diseases can be identified. We will review emerging evidence that mTOR-dependent brain vascular dysfunction, a universal feature of aging, may be one of the mechanisms linking the regulation of the rate of aging to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physiology and the Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. Electronic address: galvanv@uthscsa.edu.Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26639036

Citation

Galvan, Veronica, and Matthew J. Hart. "Vascular mTOR-dependent Mechanisms Linking the Control of Aging to Alzheimer's Disease." Biochimica Et Biophysica Acta, vol. 1862, no. 5, 2016, pp. 992-1007.
Galvan V, Hart MJ. Vascular mTOR-dependent mechanisms linking the control of aging to Alzheimer's disease. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2016;1862(5):992-1007.
Galvan, V., & Hart, M. J. (2016). Vascular mTOR-dependent mechanisms linking the control of aging to Alzheimer's disease. Biochimica Et Biophysica Acta, 1862(5), pp. 992-1007. doi:10.1016/j.bbadis.2015.11.010.
Galvan V, Hart MJ. Vascular mTOR-dependent Mechanisms Linking the Control of Aging to Alzheimer's Disease. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2016;1862(5):992-1007. PubMed PMID: 26639036.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vascular mTOR-dependent mechanisms linking the control of aging to Alzheimer's disease. AU - Galvan,Veronica, AU - Hart,Matthew J, Y1 - 2015/11/27/ PY - 2015/09/01/received PY - 2015/11/17/revised PY - 2015/11/18/accepted PY - 2015/12/8/entrez PY - 2015/12/8/pubmed PY - 2019/1/25/medline KW - Aging KW - Alzheimer's KW - Geroscience KW - MTOR KW - Neurovascular aging KW - Target of rapamycin SP - 992 EP - 1007 JF - Biochimica et biophysica acta JO - Biochim. Biophys. Acta VL - 1862 IS - 5 N2 - Aging is the strongest known risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). With the discovery of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) as a critical pathway controlling the rate of aging in mice, molecules at the interface between the regulation of aging and the mechanisms of specific age-associated diseases can be identified. We will review emerging evidence that mTOR-dependent brain vascular dysfunction, a universal feature of aging, may be one of the mechanisms linking the regulation of the rate of aging to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. SN - 0006-3002 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26639036/Vascular_mTOR_dependent_mechanisms_linking_the_control_of_aging_to_Alzheimer's_disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0925-4439(15)00349-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -