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Migraine Triggers and Oxidative Stress: A Narrative Review and Synthesis.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Blau theorized that migraine triggers are exposures that in higher amounts would damage the brain. The recent discovery that the TRPA1 ion channel transduces oxidative stress and triggers neurogenic inflammation suggests that oxidative stress may be the common denominator underlying migraine triggers.

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this review is to present and discuss the available literature on the capacity of common migraine triggers to generate oxidative stress in the brain.

METHODS

A Medline search was conducted crossing the terms "oxidative stress" and "brain" with "alcohol," "dehydration," "water deprivation," "monosodium glutamate," "aspartame," "tyramine," "phenylethylamine," "dietary nitrates," "nitrosamines," "noise," "weather," "air pollutants," "hypoglycemia," "hypoxia," "infection," "estrogen," "circadian," "sleep deprivation," "information processing," "psychosocial stress," or "nitroglycerin and tolerance." "Flavonoids" was crossed with "prooxidant." The reference lists of the resulting articles were examined for further relevant studies. The focus was on empirical studies, in vitro and of animals, of individual triggers, indicating whether and/or by what mechanism they can generate oxidative stress.

RESULTS

In all cases except pericranial pain, common migraine triggers are capable of generating oxidative stress. Depending on the trigger, mechanisms include a high rate of energy production by the mitochondria, toxicity or altered membrane properties of the mitochondria, calcium overload and excitotoxicity, neuroinflammation and activation of microglia, and activation of neuronal nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. For some triggers, oxidants also arise as a byproduct of monoamine oxidase or cytochrome P450 processing, or from uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase.

CONCLUSIONS

Oxidative stress is a plausible unifying principle behind the types of migraine triggers encountered in clinical practice. The possible implications for prevention and for understanding the nature of the migraine attack are discussed.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    Department of Psychology, University of Maine, Orono, ME, USA. Health Psych Maine, Waterville, ME, USA.

    Source

    Headache 56:1 2016 Jan pg 12-35

    MeSH

    Animals
    Brain
    Calcium Channels
    Environment
    Humans
    MEDLINE
    Migraine Disorders
    Nerve Tissue Proteins
    Oxidative Stress
    TRPA1 Cation Channel
    Transient Receptor Potential Channels

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26639834

    Citation

    Borkum, Jonathan M.. "Migraine Triggers and Oxidative Stress: a Narrative Review and Synthesis." Headache, vol. 56, no. 1, 2016, pp. 12-35.
    Borkum JM. Migraine Triggers and Oxidative Stress: A Narrative Review and Synthesis. Headache. 2016;56(1):12-35.
    Borkum, J. M. (2016). Migraine Triggers and Oxidative Stress: A Narrative Review and Synthesis. Headache, 56(1), pp. 12-35. doi:10.1111/head.12725.
    Borkum JM. Migraine Triggers and Oxidative Stress: a Narrative Review and Synthesis. Headache. 2016;56(1):12-35. PubMed PMID: 26639834.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Migraine Triggers and Oxidative Stress: A Narrative Review and Synthesis. A1 - Borkum,Jonathan M, Y1 - 2015/12/07/ PY - 2015/09/03/accepted PY - 2015/12/8/entrez PY - 2015/12/8/pubmed PY - 2017/1/7/medline KW - TRPA1 KW - antioxidants KW - migraine KW - oxidative stress KW - triggers SP - 12 EP - 35 JF - Headache JO - Headache VL - 56 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Blau theorized that migraine triggers are exposures that in higher amounts would damage the brain. The recent discovery that the TRPA1 ion channel transduces oxidative stress and triggers neurogenic inflammation suggests that oxidative stress may be the common denominator underlying migraine triggers. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this review is to present and discuss the available literature on the capacity of common migraine triggers to generate oxidative stress in the brain. METHODS: A Medline search was conducted crossing the terms "oxidative stress" and "brain" with "alcohol," "dehydration," "water deprivation," "monosodium glutamate," "aspartame," "tyramine," "phenylethylamine," "dietary nitrates," "nitrosamines," "noise," "weather," "air pollutants," "hypoglycemia," "hypoxia," "infection," "estrogen," "circadian," "sleep deprivation," "information processing," "psychosocial stress," or "nitroglycerin and tolerance." "Flavonoids" was crossed with "prooxidant." The reference lists of the resulting articles were examined for further relevant studies. The focus was on empirical studies, in vitro and of animals, of individual triggers, indicating whether and/or by what mechanism they can generate oxidative stress. RESULTS: In all cases except pericranial pain, common migraine triggers are capable of generating oxidative stress. Depending on the trigger, mechanisms include a high rate of energy production by the mitochondria, toxicity or altered membrane properties of the mitochondria, calcium overload and excitotoxicity, neuroinflammation and activation of microglia, and activation of neuronal nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. For some triggers, oxidants also arise as a byproduct of monoamine oxidase or cytochrome P450 processing, or from uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase. CONCLUSIONS: Oxidative stress is a plausible unifying principle behind the types of migraine triggers encountered in clinical practice. The possible implications for prevention and for understanding the nature of the migraine attack are discussed. SN - 1526-4610 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26639834/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/head.12725 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -