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Vitamin C intake and risk of renal cell carcinoma: a meta-analysis.
Sci Rep 2015; 5:17921SR

Abstract

Studies have showed that vitamin C intake is linked to renal cell carcinoma risk, however, the results were inconsistent. Hence, the present meta-analysis was to examine the association between vitamin C intake and RCC risk. We searched the published studies that reported the relationship between vitamin C intake and RCC risk using PubMed and Embase up to January 2015. Based on a fixed effects model, RR and the corresponding 95% CI were used to assess the pooled risk. 3 prospective cohort studies and 7 case-control studies were included. The overall RR (95% CI) of RCC for the highest vs. the lowest levels of vitamin C intake was 0.78(0.69,0.87). Little evidence of heterogeneity was found. In the subgroup analyses, we found an inverse association between vitamin C intake and RCC risk in the case-control studies but not in the prospective cohort studies. Additionally, this association between vitamin C intake and RCC risk was not differed by population distribution. Our study provides evidence that vitamin C intake is associated with a reduced RCC risk. However, our conclusion was just based on ten including studies, so more high-quality of case-control studies or cohort studies which report this topic are needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of urology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military University, Chongqing, 40037, China.Department of Nephrology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military University, Chongqing, 40037, China.Department of urology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military University, Chongqing, 40037, China.Department of urology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military University, Chongqing, 40037, China.Department of urology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military University, Chongqing, 40037, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26643589

Citation

Jia, Li, et al. "Vitamin C Intake and Risk of Renal Cell Carcinoma: a Meta-analysis." Scientific Reports, vol. 5, 2015, p. 17921.
Jia L, Jia Q, Shang Y, et al. Vitamin C intake and risk of renal cell carcinoma: a meta-analysis. Sci Rep. 2015;5:17921.
Jia, L., Jia, Q., Shang, Y., Dong, X., & Li, L. (2015). Vitamin C intake and risk of renal cell carcinoma: a meta-analysis. Scientific Reports, 5, p. 17921. doi:10.1038/srep17921.
Jia L, et al. Vitamin C Intake and Risk of Renal Cell Carcinoma: a Meta-analysis. Sci Rep. 2015 Dec 8;5:17921. PubMed PMID: 26643589.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin C intake and risk of renal cell carcinoma: a meta-analysis. AU - Jia,Li, AU - Jia,Qingling, AU - Shang,Yonggang, AU - Dong,Xingyou, AU - Li,Longkun, Y1 - 2015/12/08/ PY - 2015/04/09/received PY - 2015/09/22/accepted PY - 2015/12/9/entrez PY - 2015/12/9/pubmed PY - 2016/10/19/medline SP - 17921 EP - 17921 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 5 N2 - Studies have showed that vitamin C intake is linked to renal cell carcinoma risk, however, the results were inconsistent. Hence, the present meta-analysis was to examine the association between vitamin C intake and RCC risk. We searched the published studies that reported the relationship between vitamin C intake and RCC risk using PubMed and Embase up to January 2015. Based on a fixed effects model, RR and the corresponding 95% CI were used to assess the pooled risk. 3 prospective cohort studies and 7 case-control studies were included. The overall RR (95% CI) of RCC for the highest vs. the lowest levels of vitamin C intake was 0.78(0.69,0.87). Little evidence of heterogeneity was found. In the subgroup analyses, we found an inverse association between vitamin C intake and RCC risk in the case-control studies but not in the prospective cohort studies. Additionally, this association between vitamin C intake and RCC risk was not differed by population distribution. Our study provides evidence that vitamin C intake is associated with a reduced RCC risk. However, our conclusion was just based on ten including studies, so more high-quality of case-control studies or cohort studies which report this topic are needed. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26643589/Vitamin_C_intake_and_risk_of_renal_cell_carcinoma:_a_meta_analysis_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep17921 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -