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The Attention Network Test-Interaction (ANT-I): reliability and validity in healthy older adults.
Exp Brain Res 2016; 234(3):815-27EB

Abstract

The Attention Network Test (ANT) is a frequently used computer-based tool for measuring the three attention networks (alerting, orienting, and executive control). We examined the psychometric properties of performance on a variant of the ANT, the Attention Network Test-Interaction (ANT-I) in healthy older adults (N = 173; mean age = 65.4, SD = 6.5; obtained from the Brain in Motion Study, Tyndall et al. BMC Geriatr 13:21, 2013. doi: 10.1186/1471-2318-13-21) to evaluate its usefulness as a measurement tool in both aging and clinical research. In terms of test reliability, split-half correlation analyses showed that all network scores were significantly reliable, although the strength of the correlations varied across networks as seen before (r = 0.29, 0.70, and 0.68, for alerting, orienting, and executive networks, respectively, p's < 0.05). In terms of construct validity, ANOVAs confirmed that each network score was significant (18.3, 59.4, and 109.2 ms for the alerting, orienting, and executive networks, respectively, p's < 0.01) and that these scores were generally independent from each other. Importantly, for criterion validity, a series of hierarchical linear regressions showed that the executive network score, in addition to demographic information, was a significant predictor of performance on tests of conflict resolution as well as verbal memory and retrieval (β = -0.165 and -0.184, p's < 0.05, respectively). These results provide new information regarding the reliability and validity of ANT-I test performance in a healthy older adult population. The results provide insights into the psychometrics of the ANT-I and its potential utility in clinical research settings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. ishigami@dal.ca.Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. gail.eskes@dal.ca. Department of Psychology, Faculty of Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. gail.eskes@dal.ca. Department of Medicine (Neurology), Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. gail.eskes@dal.ca. Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. gail.eskes@dal.ca.Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. Psychology Service, Foothills Medical Centre, Calgary, Calgary, Canada.Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. poulin@ucalgary.ca. Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. poulin@ucalgary.ca. Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. poulin@ucalgary.ca. Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. poulin@ucalgary.ca.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26645310

Citation

Ishigami, Yoko, et al. "The Attention Network Test-Interaction (ANT-I): Reliability and Validity in Healthy Older Adults." Experimental Brain Research, vol. 234, no. 3, 2016, pp. 815-27.
Ishigami Y, Eskes GA, Tyndall AV, et al. The Attention Network Test-Interaction (ANT-I): reliability and validity in healthy older adults. Exp Brain Res. 2016;234(3):815-27.
Ishigami, Y., Eskes, G. A., Tyndall, A. V., Longman, R. S., Drogos, L. L., & Poulin, M. J. (2016). The Attention Network Test-Interaction (ANT-I): reliability and validity in healthy older adults. Experimental Brain Research, 234(3), pp. 815-27. doi:10.1007/s00221-015-4493-4.
Ishigami Y, et al. The Attention Network Test-Interaction (ANT-I): Reliability and Validity in Healthy Older Adults. Exp Brain Res. 2016;234(3):815-27. PubMed PMID: 26645310.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Attention Network Test-Interaction (ANT-I): reliability and validity in healthy older adults. AU - Ishigami,Yoko, AU - Eskes,Gail A, AU - Tyndall,Amanda V, AU - Longman,R Stewart, AU - Drogos,Lauren L, AU - Poulin,Marc J, Y1 - 2015/12/08/ PY - 2015/01/27/received PY - 2015/11/02/accepted PY - 2015/12/10/entrez PY - 2015/12/10/pubmed PY - 2016/12/15/medline KW - Attention Network Test KW - Brain in Motion study KW - Neuropsychological tests KW - Older adults KW - Psychometrics SP - 815 EP - 27 JF - Experimental brain research JO - Exp Brain Res VL - 234 IS - 3 N2 - The Attention Network Test (ANT) is a frequently used computer-based tool for measuring the three attention networks (alerting, orienting, and executive control). We examined the psychometric properties of performance on a variant of the ANT, the Attention Network Test-Interaction (ANT-I) in healthy older adults (N = 173; mean age = 65.4, SD = 6.5; obtained from the Brain in Motion Study, Tyndall et al. BMC Geriatr 13:21, 2013. doi: 10.1186/1471-2318-13-21) to evaluate its usefulness as a measurement tool in both aging and clinical research. In terms of test reliability, split-half correlation analyses showed that all network scores were significantly reliable, although the strength of the correlations varied across networks as seen before (r = 0.29, 0.70, and 0.68, for alerting, orienting, and executive networks, respectively, p's < 0.05). In terms of construct validity, ANOVAs confirmed that each network score was significant (18.3, 59.4, and 109.2 ms for the alerting, orienting, and executive networks, respectively, p's < 0.01) and that these scores were generally independent from each other. Importantly, for criterion validity, a series of hierarchical linear regressions showed that the executive network score, in addition to demographic information, was a significant predictor of performance on tests of conflict resolution as well as verbal memory and retrieval (β = -0.165 and -0.184, p's < 0.05, respectively). These results provide new information regarding the reliability and validity of ANT-I test performance in a healthy older adult population. The results provide insights into the psychometrics of the ANT-I and its potential utility in clinical research settings. SN - 1432-1106 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26645310/The_Attention_Network_Test_Interaction__ANT_I_:_reliability_and_validity_in_healthy_older_adults_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-015-4493-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -