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Exposure to bisphenol A and behavior in school-age children.
Neurotoxicology. 2016 Mar; 53:12-19.N

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Bisphenol A (BPA) exposure has been shown to affect human brain neurodevelopment and behavior.

OBJECTIVE

We aimed to investigate whether environmental exposure to BPA in children was associated with their childhood behavior.

METHODS

Urinary BPA concentrations and behavioral characteristics were assessed in 300 children belonging to the INMA "Environment and Childhood" Granada birth cohort in their follow-up at 9-11 years of age. BPA concentrations were quantified in urine using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS), and child behavior reported by parents using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL/6-18) under supervision of a psychologist. The association between BPA concentrations and CBCL standardized scores was analyzed using linear regression models, adjusted for important covariates.

RESULTS

Median (P25, P75) BPA concentration was 4.76 (2.77, 9.03)μg/L. Mean (±SD) CBCL externalizing and internalizing scores were 56.35 (±8.06) and 51.36 (±9.22), respectively. In multivariate regression analyses, adjusted for maternal and child characteristics, higher BPA concentrations were associated with worse behavioral scores on all scales. Children with BPA concentrations in the 4th quartile had more somatic complaints (β=2.35; 95% CI: 0.25, 4.46) and social (β=1.71; 95% CI: 0.19, 3.22) and thought problems (β=2.58; 95% CI: 0.66, 4.51) in comparison to those in the 1st quartile. Children with values in the 3rd quartile of BPA concentrations also showed greater social problems (β=1.94; 95% CI: 0.43, 3.45).

CONCLUSIONS

Our results suggest that exposure to BPA in childhood may affect children's behavior. Although further investigations are required, preventive measures should be undertaken to reduce inadvertent exposure to BPA.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, University of Granada, Av. Madrid s/n, Granada 18071, Spain.Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, University of Granada, Av. Madrid s/n, Granada 18071, Spain.Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, University of Granada, Av. Madrid s/n, Granada 18071, Spain.Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, University of Granada, Av. Madrid s/n, Granada 18071, Spain.Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, University of Granada, Av. Madrid s/n, Granada 18071, Spain.University of Córdoba, Institute of Fine Chemistry and Nanochemistry, 14017 Córdoba, Spain.University of Córdoba, Institute of Fine Chemistry and Nanochemistry, 14017 Córdoba, Spain.University of Córdoba, Institute of Fine Chemistry and Nanochemistry, 14017 Córdoba, Spain.Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, University of Granada, Av. Madrid s/n, Granada 18071, Spain; CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, University of Granada, Av. Madrid s/n, Granada 18071, Spain; CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: marieta@ugr.es.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26654821

Citation

Perez-Lobato, R, et al. "Exposure to Bisphenol a and Behavior in School-age Children." Neurotoxicology, vol. 53, 2016, pp. 12-19.
Perez-Lobato R, Mustieles V, Calvente I, et al. Exposure to bisphenol A and behavior in school-age children. Neurotoxicology. 2016;53:12-19.
Perez-Lobato, R., Mustieles, V., Calvente, I., Jimenez-Diaz, I., Ramos, R., Caballero-Casero, N., López-Jiménez, F. J., Rubio, S., Olea, N., & Fernandez, M. F. (2016). Exposure to bisphenol A and behavior in school-age children. Neurotoxicology, 53, 12-19. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuro.2015.12.001
Perez-Lobato R, et al. Exposure to Bisphenol a and Behavior in School-age Children. Neurotoxicology. 2016;53:12-19. PubMed PMID: 26654821.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exposure to bisphenol A and behavior in school-age children. AU - Perez-Lobato,R, AU - Mustieles,V, AU - Calvente,I, AU - Jimenez-Diaz,I, AU - Ramos,R, AU - Caballero-Casero,N, AU - López-Jiménez,F J, AU - Rubio,S, AU - Olea,N, AU - Fernandez,M F, Y1 - 2015/12/04/ PY - 2015/09/09/received PY - 2015/11/12/revised PY - 2015/12/01/accepted PY - 2015/12/15/entrez PY - 2015/12/15/pubmed PY - 2016/12/20/medline KW - BPA exposure KW - Birth cohort KW - Cognitive and behavior functioning KW - Healthy children SP - 12 EP - 19 JF - Neurotoxicology JO - Neurotoxicology VL - 53 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Bisphenol A (BPA) exposure has been shown to affect human brain neurodevelopment and behavior. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate whether environmental exposure to BPA in children was associated with their childhood behavior. METHODS: Urinary BPA concentrations and behavioral characteristics were assessed in 300 children belonging to the INMA "Environment and Childhood" Granada birth cohort in their follow-up at 9-11 years of age. BPA concentrations were quantified in urine using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS), and child behavior reported by parents using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL/6-18) under supervision of a psychologist. The association between BPA concentrations and CBCL standardized scores was analyzed using linear regression models, adjusted for important covariates. RESULTS: Median (P25, P75) BPA concentration was 4.76 (2.77, 9.03)μg/L. Mean (±SD) CBCL externalizing and internalizing scores were 56.35 (±8.06) and 51.36 (±9.22), respectively. In multivariate regression analyses, adjusted for maternal and child characteristics, higher BPA concentrations were associated with worse behavioral scores on all scales. Children with BPA concentrations in the 4th quartile had more somatic complaints (β=2.35; 95% CI: 0.25, 4.46) and social (β=1.71; 95% CI: 0.19, 3.22) and thought problems (β=2.58; 95% CI: 0.66, 4.51) in comparison to those in the 1st quartile. Children with values in the 3rd quartile of BPA concentrations also showed greater social problems (β=1.94; 95% CI: 0.43, 3.45). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that exposure to BPA in childhood may affect children's behavior. Although further investigations are required, preventive measures should be undertaken to reduce inadvertent exposure to BPA. SN - 1872-9711 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26654821/Exposure_to_bisphenol_A_and_behavior_in_school_age_children_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0161-813X(15)30035-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -