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Nonoccupational Postexposure Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prophylaxis: Acceptance Following Sexual Assault.
Nurs Res 2016 Jan-Feb; 65(1):47-54NR

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Nonoccupational postexposure prophylaxis (nPEP) for HIV following sexual assault may decrease the likelihood of HIV transmission.

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this exploratory chart review study was to examine factors associated with patients accepting post-sexual assault nPEP at three forensic nurse examiner programs in urban settings.

METHODS

Forensic nursing charts of patients presenting for acute sexual assault care were reviewed as part of a mixed-methods study.

RESULTS

Patients assaulted by more than one or an unknown number of assailants were over 12 times more likely to accept the offer of nPEP (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 12.66, 95% CI [2.77, 57.82]). In cases where no condom was used (aOR = 8.57, 95% CI [1.59, 46.10]) or when any injury to the anus or genitalia was noted (aOR = 4.10, 95% CI [1.57, 10.75]), patients were more likely to accept nPEP. Patients with any injury to the face or head were less likely to initiate nPEP (aOR = 0.32, 95% CI [0.11, 0.97]).

DISCUSSION

This study is an important first step in understanding factors associated with nPEP acceptance after sexual assault.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Jessica E. Draughon Moret, PhD, RN, SANE-A, is Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing, Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing, University of California Davis. William E. Hauda II, MD, is Medical Director, Forensic Assessment and Consultation Team, Inova Fairfax Hospital, Falls Church, Virginia. Bonnie Price, RN, SANE-A, SANE-P, AFN-BC, is Director, Forensic Nurse Examiner Program, Bon Secours St. Mary's Hospital, Richmond, Virginia. Daniel J. Sheridan, PhD, RN, FAAN, is Professor, Goldfarb School of Nursing, Barnes-Jewish College, St. Louis, Missouri.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26657480

Citation

Draughon Moret, Jessica E., et al. "Nonoccupational Postexposure Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prophylaxis: Acceptance Following Sexual Assault." Nursing Research, vol. 65, no. 1, 2016, pp. 47-54.
Draughon Moret JE, Hauda WE, Price B, et al. Nonoccupational Postexposure Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prophylaxis: Acceptance Following Sexual Assault. Nurs Res. 2016;65(1):47-54.
Draughon Moret, J. E., Hauda, W. E., Price, B., & Sheridan, D. J. (2016). Nonoccupational Postexposure Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prophylaxis: Acceptance Following Sexual Assault. Nursing Research, 65(1), pp. 47-54. doi:10.1097/NNR.0000000000000122.
Draughon Moret JE, et al. Nonoccupational Postexposure Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prophylaxis: Acceptance Following Sexual Assault. Nurs Res. 2016;65(1):47-54. PubMed PMID: 26657480.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nonoccupational Postexposure Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prophylaxis: Acceptance Following Sexual Assault. AU - Draughon Moret,Jessica E, AU - Hauda,William E,2nd AU - Price,Bonnie, AU - Sheridan,Daniel J, PY - 2015/12/15/entrez PY - 2015/12/15/pubmed PY - 2016/4/12/medline SP - 47 EP - 54 JF - Nursing research JO - Nurs Res VL - 65 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Nonoccupational postexposure prophylaxis (nPEP) for HIV following sexual assault may decrease the likelihood of HIV transmission. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this exploratory chart review study was to examine factors associated with patients accepting post-sexual assault nPEP at three forensic nurse examiner programs in urban settings. METHODS: Forensic nursing charts of patients presenting for acute sexual assault care were reviewed as part of a mixed-methods study. RESULTS: Patients assaulted by more than one or an unknown number of assailants were over 12 times more likely to accept the offer of nPEP (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 12.66, 95% CI [2.77, 57.82]). In cases where no condom was used (aOR = 8.57, 95% CI [1.59, 46.10]) or when any injury to the anus or genitalia was noted (aOR = 4.10, 95% CI [1.57, 10.75]), patients were more likely to accept nPEP. Patients with any injury to the face or head were less likely to initiate nPEP (aOR = 0.32, 95% CI [0.11, 0.97]). DISCUSSION: This study is an important first step in understanding factors associated with nPEP acceptance after sexual assault. SN - 1538-9847 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26657480/Nonoccupational_Postexposure_Human_Immunodeficiency_Virus_Prophylaxis:_Acceptance_Following_Sexual_Assault_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=26657480 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -