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The Relationship Between Food Insecurity and BMI for Preschool Children.
Matern Child Health J. 2016 Apr; 20(4):925-33.MC

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The literature exploring the relationship between food insecurity and obesity for preschool-aged children is inconclusive and suffers from inconsistent measurement. This paper explores the relationships between concurrent household and child food insecurity and child overweight as well as differences in these relationships by child gender using a sample of 2-5 year old children.

METHODS

Using measured height and weight and responses to the Household Food Security Survey Module collected from a sample of 438 preschool-aged children (mean age 39 months) and their mothers, logistic regression models were fit to estimate the relationship between household and child food insecurity and child BMI. Separate models were fit for girls and boys.

RESULTS

Twenty-seven percent of children from food insecure households and 25 % of child food insecure children were overweight or obese (BMI ≥ 85 %). There were no statistically significant associations between either household or child food insecurity and BMI for the full sample. For girls, but not boys, household food insecurity was associated with BMI z-scores (β = 0.23, p = 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

Although food insecurity and overweight were not significantly associated, a noteworthy proportion of food insecure children were overweight or obese. Programs for young children should address food insecurity and obesity simultaneously by ensuring that young children have regular access to nutrient-dense foods.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Family Resiliency Center, Department of Human Development and Family Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 904 West Nevada Street, MC-081, Urbana, IL, USA. kspeirs@illinois.edu. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, 61801, USA. kspeirs@illinois.edu.Family Resiliency Center, Department of Human Development and Family Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 904 West Nevada Street, MC-081, Urbana, IL, USA. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, 61801, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26662281

Citation

Speirs, Katherine E., et al. "The Relationship Between Food Insecurity and BMI for Preschool Children." Maternal and Child Health Journal, vol. 20, no. 4, 2016, pp. 925-33.
Speirs KE, Fiese BH, STRONG Kids Research Team. The Relationship Between Food Insecurity and BMI for Preschool Children. Matern Child Health J. 2016;20(4):925-33.
Speirs, K. E., & Fiese, B. H. (2016). The Relationship Between Food Insecurity and BMI for Preschool Children. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 20(4), 925-33. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-015-1881-0
Speirs KE, Fiese BH, STRONG Kids Research Team. The Relationship Between Food Insecurity and BMI for Preschool Children. Matern Child Health J. 2016;20(4):925-33. PubMed PMID: 26662281.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Relationship Between Food Insecurity and BMI for Preschool Children. AU - Speirs,Katherine E, AU - Fiese,Barbara H, AU - ,, PY - 2015/12/15/entrez PY - 2015/12/15/pubmed PY - 2017/1/4/medline KW - Body mass index KW - Child health KW - Childhood obesity KW - Food insecurity KW - Preschool-aged children SP - 925 EP - 33 JF - Maternal and child health journal JO - Matern Child Health J VL - 20 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The literature exploring the relationship between food insecurity and obesity for preschool-aged children is inconclusive and suffers from inconsistent measurement. This paper explores the relationships between concurrent household and child food insecurity and child overweight as well as differences in these relationships by child gender using a sample of 2-5 year old children. METHODS: Using measured height and weight and responses to the Household Food Security Survey Module collected from a sample of 438 preschool-aged children (mean age 39 months) and their mothers, logistic regression models were fit to estimate the relationship between household and child food insecurity and child BMI. Separate models were fit for girls and boys. RESULTS: Twenty-seven percent of children from food insecure households and 25 % of child food insecure children were overweight or obese (BMI ≥ 85 %). There were no statistically significant associations between either household or child food insecurity and BMI for the full sample. For girls, but not boys, household food insecurity was associated with BMI z-scores (β = 0.23, p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Although food insecurity and overweight were not significantly associated, a noteworthy proportion of food insecure children were overweight or obese. Programs for young children should address food insecurity and obesity simultaneously by ensuring that young children have regular access to nutrient-dense foods. SN - 1573-6628 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26662281/The_Relationship_Between_Food_Insecurity_and_BMI_for_Preschool_Children_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-015-1881-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -