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Rodent-borne infectious disease outbreaks after flooding disasters: Epidemiology, management, and prevention.
Am J Disaster Med. 2015 Autumn; 10(3):259-67.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To alert clinicians to the climatic conditions that can precipitate outbreaks of the rodent-borne infectious diseases most often associated with flooding disasters, leptospirosis (LS), and the Hantavirus-caused diseases, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS); to describe the epidemiology and presenting clinical manifestations and outcomes of these rodent-borne infectious diseases; and to recommend both prophylactic therapies and effective control and prevention strategies for rodent-borne infectious diseases.

DESIGN

Internet search engines, including Google®, Google Scholar®, Pub Med, Medline, and Ovid, were queried with the key words as search terms to examine the latest scientific articles on rodent-borne infectious disease outbreaks in the United States and worldwide to describe the epidemiology and presenting clinical manifestations and outcomes of LS and Hantavirus outbreaks.

SETTING

Not applicable.

PARTICIPANTS

Not applicable.

INTERVENTIONS

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Rodent-borne infectious disease outbreaks following heavy rainfall and flooding disasters.

RESULTS

Heavy rainfall encourages excessive wild grass seed production that supports increased outdoor rodent population densities; and flooding forces rodents from their burrows near water sources into the built environment and closer to humans.

CONCLUSIONS

Healthcare providers should maintain high levels of suspicion for LS in patients developing febrile illnesses after contaminated freshwater exposures following heavy rainfall, flooding, and even freshwater recreational events; and for Hantavirus-caused infectious diseases in patients with hemorrhagic fevers that progress rapidly to respiratory or renal failure following rodent exposures.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Environmental/Occupational Health, LSU School of Public Health, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26663308

Citation

Diaz, James H.. "Rodent-borne Infectious Disease Outbreaks After Flooding Disasters: Epidemiology, Management, and Prevention." American Journal of Disaster Medicine, vol. 10, no. 3, 2015, pp. 259-67.
Diaz JH. Rodent-borne infectious disease outbreaks after flooding disasters: Epidemiology, management, and prevention. Am J Disaster Med. 2015;10(3):259-67.
Diaz, J. H. (2015). Rodent-borne infectious disease outbreaks after flooding disasters: Epidemiology, management, and prevention. American Journal of Disaster Medicine, 10(3), 259-67. https://doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2015.0207
Diaz JH. Rodent-borne Infectious Disease Outbreaks After Flooding Disasters: Epidemiology, Management, and Prevention. Am J Disaster Med. 2015;10(3):259-67. PubMed PMID: 26663308.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Rodent-borne infectious disease outbreaks after flooding disasters: Epidemiology, management, and prevention. A1 - Diaz,James H, PY - 2015/12/15/entrez PY - 2015/12/15/pubmed PY - 2016/4/9/medline SP - 259 EP - 67 JF - American journal of disaster medicine JO - Am J Disaster Med VL - 10 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To alert clinicians to the climatic conditions that can precipitate outbreaks of the rodent-borne infectious diseases most often associated with flooding disasters, leptospirosis (LS), and the Hantavirus-caused diseases, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS); to describe the epidemiology and presenting clinical manifestations and outcomes of these rodent-borne infectious diseases; and to recommend both prophylactic therapies and effective control and prevention strategies for rodent-borne infectious diseases. DESIGN: Internet search engines, including Google®, Google Scholar®, Pub Med, Medline, and Ovid, were queried with the key words as search terms to examine the latest scientific articles on rodent-borne infectious disease outbreaks in the United States and worldwide to describe the epidemiology and presenting clinical manifestations and outcomes of LS and Hantavirus outbreaks. SETTING: Not applicable. PARTICIPANTS: Not applicable. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Rodent-borne infectious disease outbreaks following heavy rainfall and flooding disasters. RESULTS: Heavy rainfall encourages excessive wild grass seed production that supports increased outdoor rodent population densities; and flooding forces rodents from their burrows near water sources into the built environment and closer to humans. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare providers should maintain high levels of suspicion for LS in patients developing febrile illnesses after contaminated freshwater exposures following heavy rainfall, flooding, and even freshwater recreational events; and for Hantavirus-caused infectious diseases in patients with hemorrhagic fevers that progress rapidly to respiratory or renal failure following rodent exposures. SN - 1932-149X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26663308/Rodent_borne_infectious_disease_outbreaks_after_flooding_disasters:_Epidemiology_management_and_prevention_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/floods.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -