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'It's all in the message': the utility of personalised short message service (SMS) texts to remind patients at higher risk of STIs and HIV to reattend for testing-a repeat before and after study.
Sex Transm Infect. 2016 08; 92(5):393-5.ST

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Patients at increased risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs)/HIV acquisition are advised to reattend for retesting. A previous study showed that 'generic' text reminders did not improve reattendance.

AIM

To assess if a personalised text message with increased contact information would increase reattendance rates of at-risk patients.

METHODS

Patients who are at risk of future STIs, defined by having a current acute STI, attending for emergency contraception, commercial sex workers (CSWs) or men who have sex with men (MSM), were sent a text reminder to reattend for retesting 6 weeks after initial visit. Reattendance rates were measured for September to December 2012 (control group who received a generic text message) and February to May 2014 (intervention 'personalised message' group who received a text message containing their first name and ways to contact the clinic). Reattendance was counted within 4 months of the end of the initial episode of care.

RESULTS

The reattendance rate was significantly higher for the intervention group: 149/266 (56%) than the control group: 90/273 (33%) (p=0.0001) and was also significantly higher in the intervention group than the control group in patients with the following risks: recent chlamydia (64/123 (52%) vs 43/121 (36%)) (p=0.03), recent gonorrhoea (41/64 (64%) vs 4/21 (19%)) (p=0.0003) and MSM (26/45 (58%) vs 3/18 (16%)) (p=0.006). New STI rates in the reattending intervention group and controls were 26/ 149 (17%) and 13/90 (14%) (n.s), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Sending a personalised text message with increased contact information as a reminder for retesting increased reattendance rates by 23% in patients who are at higher risk of STIs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Patrick Clements Clinic, Department of Sexual Health and HIV, London North West Healthcare NHS Trust, Central Middlesex Hospital, London, UK.Patrick Clements Clinic, Department of Sexual Health and HIV, London North West Healthcare NHS Trust, Central Middlesex Hospital, London, UK.Patrick Clements Clinic, Department of Sexual Health and HIV, London North West Healthcare NHS Trust, Central Middlesex Hospital, London, UK.Patrick Clements Clinic, Department of Sexual Health and HIV, London North West Healthcare NHS Trust, Central Middlesex Hospital, London, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26670912

Citation

Nyatsanza, Farai, et al. "'It's All in the Message': the Utility of Personalised Short Message Service (SMS) Texts to Remind Patients at Higher Risk of STIs and HIV to Reattend for Testing-a Repeat Before and After Study." Sexually Transmitted Infections, vol. 92, no. 5, 2016, pp. 393-5.
Nyatsanza F, McSorley J, Murphy S, et al. 'It's all in the message': the utility of personalised short message service (SMS) texts to remind patients at higher risk of STIs and HIV to reattend for testing-a repeat before and after study. Sex Transm Infect. 2016;92(5):393-5.
Nyatsanza, F., McSorley, J., Murphy, S., & Brook, G. (2016). 'It's all in the message': the utility of personalised short message service (SMS) texts to remind patients at higher risk of STIs and HIV to reattend for testing-a repeat before and after study. Sexually Transmitted Infections, 92(5), 393-5. https://doi.org/10.1136/sextrans-2015-052216
Nyatsanza F, et al. 'It's All in the Message': the Utility of Personalised Short Message Service (SMS) Texts to Remind Patients at Higher Risk of STIs and HIV to Reattend for Testing-a Repeat Before and After Study. Sex Transm Infect. 2016;92(5):393-5. PubMed PMID: 26670912.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - 'It's all in the message': the utility of personalised short message service (SMS) texts to remind patients at higher risk of STIs and HIV to reattend for testing-a repeat before and after study. AU - Nyatsanza,Farai, AU - McSorley,John, AU - Murphy,Siobhan, AU - Brook,Gary, Y1 - 2015/12/15/ PY - 2015/06/15/received PY - 2015/11/22/accepted PY - 2015/12/17/entrez PY - 2015/12/17/pubmed PY - 2017/8/16/medline KW - CHLAMYDIA INFECTION KW - COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES KW - GONORRHOEA KW - HEALTH SERV RESEARCH KW - SEXUAL HEALTH SP - 393 EP - 5 JF - Sexually transmitted infections JO - Sex Transm Infect VL - 92 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Patients at increased risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs)/HIV acquisition are advised to reattend for retesting. A previous study showed that 'generic' text reminders did not improve reattendance. AIM: To assess if a personalised text message with increased contact information would increase reattendance rates of at-risk patients. METHODS: Patients who are at risk of future STIs, defined by having a current acute STI, attending for emergency contraception, commercial sex workers (CSWs) or men who have sex with men (MSM), were sent a text reminder to reattend for retesting 6 weeks after initial visit. Reattendance rates were measured for September to December 2012 (control group who received a generic text message) and February to May 2014 (intervention 'personalised message' group who received a text message containing their first name and ways to contact the clinic). Reattendance was counted within 4 months of the end of the initial episode of care. RESULTS: The reattendance rate was significantly higher for the intervention group: 149/266 (56%) than the control group: 90/273 (33%) (p=0.0001) and was also significantly higher in the intervention group than the control group in patients with the following risks: recent chlamydia (64/123 (52%) vs 43/121 (36%)) (p=0.03), recent gonorrhoea (41/64 (64%) vs 4/21 (19%)) (p=0.0003) and MSM (26/45 (58%) vs 3/18 (16%)) (p=0.006). New STI rates in the reattending intervention group and controls were 26/ 149 (17%) and 13/90 (14%) (n.s), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Sending a personalised text message with increased contact information as a reminder for retesting increased reattendance rates by 23% in patients who are at higher risk of STIs. SN - 1472-3263 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26670912/'It's_all_in_the_message':_the_utility_of_personalised_short_message_service__SMS__texts_to_remind_patients_at_higher_risk_of_STIs_and_HIV_to_reattend_for_testing_a_repeat_before_and_after_study_ L2 - https://sti.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=26670912 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -