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Escherichia coli and urinary tract infections: the role of poultry-meat.

Abstract

Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is the most common cause of community-acquired and hospital-acquired extraintestinal infections. The hypothesis that human ExPEC may have a food animal reservoir has been a topic of investigation by multiple groups around the world. Experimental studies showing the shared pathogenic potential of human ExPEC and avian pathogenic E. coli suggest that these extraintestinal E. coli may be derived from the same bacterial lineages or share common evolutionary roots. The consistent observation of specific human ExPEC lineages in poultry or poultry products, and rarely in other meat commodities, supports the hypothesis that there may be a poultry reservoir for human ExPEC. The time lag between human ExPEC acquisition (in the intestine) and infection is the fundamental challenge facing studies attempting to attribute ExPEC transmission to poultry or other environmental sources. Even whole genome sequencing efforts to address attribution will struggle with defining meaningful genetic relationships outside of a discrete food-borne outbreak setting. However, if even a fraction of all human ExPEC infections, especially antimicrobial-resistant ExPEC infections, is attributable to the introduction of multidrug-resistant ExPEC lineages through contaminated food product(s), the relevance to public health, food animal production and food safety will be significant.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    University of British Columbia, School of Population and Public Health, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Electronic address: amee.manges@ubc.ca.

    Source

    MeSH

    Animals
    Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
    Escherichia coli
    Escherichia coli Infections
    Food Microbiology
    Humans
    Meat
    Phylogeny
    Poultry
    Poultry Diseases
    Urinary Tract Infections
    Zoonoses

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26679924

    Citation

    Manges, A R.. "Escherichia Coli and Urinary Tract Infections: the Role of Poultry-meat." Clinical Microbiology and Infection : the Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, vol. 22, no. 2, 2016, pp. 122-129.
    Manges AR. Escherichia coli and urinary tract infections: the role of poultry-meat. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2016;22(2):122-129.
    Manges, A. R. (2016). Escherichia coli and urinary tract infections: the role of poultry-meat. Clinical Microbiology and Infection : the Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, 22(2), pp. 122-129. doi:10.1016/j.cmi.2015.11.010.
    Manges AR. Escherichia Coli and Urinary Tract Infections: the Role of Poultry-meat. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2016;22(2):122-129. PubMed PMID: 26679924.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Escherichia coli and urinary tract infections: the role of poultry-meat. A1 - Manges,A R, Y1 - 2015/12/08/ PY - 2015/10/05/received PY - 2015/11/23/revised PY - 2015/11/24/accepted PY - 2015/12/19/entrez PY - 2015/12/19/pubmed PY - 2016/11/1/medline KW - Chicken KW - Escherichia coli KW - extraintestinal infections KW - extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli KW - poultry KW - reservoir KW - retail meat KW - urinary tract infections SP - 122 EP - 129 JF - Clinical microbiology and infection : the official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases JO - Clin. Microbiol. Infect. VL - 22 IS - 2 N2 - Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is the most common cause of community-acquired and hospital-acquired extraintestinal infections. The hypothesis that human ExPEC may have a food animal reservoir has been a topic of investigation by multiple groups around the world. Experimental studies showing the shared pathogenic potential of human ExPEC and avian pathogenic E. coli suggest that these extraintestinal E. coli may be derived from the same bacterial lineages or share common evolutionary roots. The consistent observation of specific human ExPEC lineages in poultry or poultry products, and rarely in other meat commodities, supports the hypothesis that there may be a poultry reservoir for human ExPEC. The time lag between human ExPEC acquisition (in the intestine) and infection is the fundamental challenge facing studies attempting to attribute ExPEC transmission to poultry or other environmental sources. Even whole genome sequencing efforts to address attribution will struggle with defining meaningful genetic relationships outside of a discrete food-borne outbreak setting. However, if even a fraction of all human ExPEC infections, especially antimicrobial-resistant ExPEC infections, is attributable to the introduction of multidrug-resistant ExPEC lineages through contaminated food product(s), the relevance to public health, food animal production and food safety will be significant. SN - 1469-0691 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26679924/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1198-743X(15)00992-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -