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Prevalence and correlates of DSM-5 eating disorders in patients with bipolar disorder.
J Affect Disord. 2016 Feb; 191:216-21.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine prevalence rates and clinical correlates of current DSM-5 eating disorders in patients with bipolar disorder (BP).

METHODS

Prevalence rates of current DSM-5- and DSM-IV-defined binge eating disorder (BED), bulimia nervosa (BN), and anorexia nervosa (AN) were assessed with the Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale (EDDS) in 1092 patients with BP. Psychiatric illness burden was evaluated with five proxy measures of BP illness severity. Medical illness burden was evaluated with the Cumulative Index Rating Scale (CIRS).

RESULTS

Twenty-seven percent of patients had a current DSM-5 eating disorder: 12% had BED, 15% had BN, and 0.2% had AN. Rates of DSM-5-defined BED and BN were higher than clinical diagnosis rates and rates of DSM-IV-defined BED and BN. Compared with BP patients without an eating disorder, BP patients with a DSM-5 eating disorder were younger and more likely to be women; had an earlier age of onset of BP; had higher EDDS composite scores and higher degrees of suicidality, mood instability, and anxiety disorder comorbidity; and had a higher mean BMI, higher rate of obesity, and higher CIRS total scores. In a logistic regression model controlling for previously identified correlates of an eating disorder, younger age, female gender, and higher BMI remained significantly associated with an eating disorder.

LIMITATIONS

The EDDS has not been validated in BP patients.

CONCLUSION

DSM-5-defined BED and BN are common in BP patients, possibly more common than DSM-IV-defined BED and BN, and associated with greater psychiatric and general medical illness burden. Further studies assessing DSM-5 eating disorders in people with BP are greatly needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Lindner Center of HOPE, 4075 Old Western Row Road, Mason, OH 45040, USA; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA. Electronic address: susan.mcelroy@lindnercenter.org.Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USA; The Emily Program, St. Paul, MN, USA.Lindner Center of HOPE, 4075 Old Western Row Road, Mason, OH 45040, USA; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA.Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA; Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA.Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA.Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA.Department of Psychiatry, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Mexico.Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA.Universidad de los Andes, Facultad de Medicina, Departamento de Psiquiatría, Santiago, Chile.Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA.Lindner Center of HOPE, 4075 Old Western Row Road, Mason, OH 45040, USA; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA.Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA.Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USA.Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26682490

Citation

McElroy, Susan L., et al. "Prevalence and Correlates of DSM-5 Eating Disorders in Patients With Bipolar Disorder." Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 191, 2016, pp. 216-21.
McElroy SL, Crow S, Blom TJ, et al. Prevalence and correlates of DSM-5 eating disorders in patients with bipolar disorder. J Affect Disord. 2016;191:216-21.
McElroy, S. L., Crow, S., Blom, T. J., Biernacka, J. M., Winham, S. J., Geske, J., Cuellar-Barboza, A. B., Bobo, W. V., Prieto, M. L., Veldic, M., Mori, N., Seymour, L. R., Bond, D. J., & Frye, M. A. (2016). Prevalence and correlates of DSM-5 eating disorders in patients with bipolar disorder. Journal of Affective Disorders, 191, 216-21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2015.11.010
McElroy SL, et al. Prevalence and Correlates of DSM-5 Eating Disorders in Patients With Bipolar Disorder. J Affect Disord. 2016;191:216-21. PubMed PMID: 26682490.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence and correlates of DSM-5 eating disorders in patients with bipolar disorder. AU - McElroy,Susan L, AU - Crow,Scott, AU - Blom,Thomas J, AU - Biernacka,Joanna M, AU - Winham,Stacey J, AU - Geske,Jennifer, AU - Cuellar-Barboza,Alfredo B, AU - Bobo,William V, AU - Prieto,Miguel L, AU - Veldic,Marin, AU - Mori,Nicole, AU - Seymour,Lisa R, AU - Bond,David J, AU - Frye,Mark A, Y1 - 2015/11/19/ PY - 2015/07/01/received PY - 2015/08/27/revised PY - 2015/11/09/accepted PY - 2015/12/20/entrez PY - 2015/12/20/pubmed PY - 2016/9/7/medline KW - Binge eating KW - Bipolar disorder KW - Bulimia nervosa KW - DSM-5 eating disorders SP - 216 EP - 21 JF - Journal of affective disorders JO - J Affect Disord VL - 191 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine prevalence rates and clinical correlates of current DSM-5 eating disorders in patients with bipolar disorder (BP). METHODS: Prevalence rates of current DSM-5- and DSM-IV-defined binge eating disorder (BED), bulimia nervosa (BN), and anorexia nervosa (AN) were assessed with the Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale (EDDS) in 1092 patients with BP. Psychiatric illness burden was evaluated with five proxy measures of BP illness severity. Medical illness burden was evaluated with the Cumulative Index Rating Scale (CIRS). RESULTS: Twenty-seven percent of patients had a current DSM-5 eating disorder: 12% had BED, 15% had BN, and 0.2% had AN. Rates of DSM-5-defined BED and BN were higher than clinical diagnosis rates and rates of DSM-IV-defined BED and BN. Compared with BP patients without an eating disorder, BP patients with a DSM-5 eating disorder were younger and more likely to be women; had an earlier age of onset of BP; had higher EDDS composite scores and higher degrees of suicidality, mood instability, and anxiety disorder comorbidity; and had a higher mean BMI, higher rate of obesity, and higher CIRS total scores. In a logistic regression model controlling for previously identified correlates of an eating disorder, younger age, female gender, and higher BMI remained significantly associated with an eating disorder. LIMITATIONS: The EDDS has not been validated in BP patients. CONCLUSION: DSM-5-defined BED and BN are common in BP patients, possibly more common than DSM-IV-defined BED and BN, and associated with greater psychiatric and general medical illness burden. Further studies assessing DSM-5 eating disorders in people with BP are greatly needed. SN - 1573-2517 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26682490/Prevalence_and_correlates_of_DSM_5_eating_disorders_in_patients_with_bipolar_disorder_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-0327(15)30519-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -