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"Why are you pregnant? What were you thinking?": How women navigate experiences of HIV-related stigma in medical settings during pregnancy and birth.
Soc Work Health Care. 2016; 55(2):161-79.SW

Abstract

Having children is a growing reality for women living with HIV in Canada. It is imperative to understand and respond to women's unique experiences and psychosocial challenges during pregnancy and as mothers including HIV-related stigma. This qualitative study used a narrative methodological approach to understand women's experiences of HIV-related stigma as they navigate health services in pregnancy (n = 66) and early postpartum (n = 64). Narratives of women living with HIV expose the spaces where stigmatizing practices emerge as women seek perinatal care and support, as well as highlight the relationship between HIV-related stigma and disclosure, and the impact this has on women's pregnancy and birthing experiences.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a School of Social Work , McMaster University , Hamilton , Ontario , Canada.a School of Social Work , McMaster University , Hamilton , Ontario , Canada.c School of Social Work , McMaster University , Hamilton , Ontario , Canada.c School of Social Work , McMaster University , Hamilton , Ontario , Canada.b Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital , University of Toronto , Toronto, Ontario , Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26684355

Citation

Greene, Saara, et al. ""Why Are You Pregnant? what Were You Thinking?": How Women Navigate Experiences of HIV-related Stigma in Medical Settings During Pregnancy and Birth." Social Work in Health Care, vol. 55, no. 2, 2016, pp. 161-79.
Greene S, Ion A, Kwaramba G, et al. "Why are you pregnant? What were you thinking?": How women navigate experiences of HIV-related stigma in medical settings during pregnancy and birth. Soc Work Health Care. 2016;55(2):161-79.
Greene, S., Ion, A., Kwaramba, G., Smith, S., & Loutfy, M. R. (2016). "Why are you pregnant? What were you thinking?": How women navigate experiences of HIV-related stigma in medical settings during pregnancy and birth. Social Work in Health Care, 55(2), 161-79. https://doi.org/10.1080/00981389.2015.1081665
Greene S, et al. "Why Are You Pregnant? what Were You Thinking?": How Women Navigate Experiences of HIV-related Stigma in Medical Settings During Pregnancy and Birth. Soc Work Health Care. 2016;55(2):161-79. PubMed PMID: 26684355.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - "Why are you pregnant? What were you thinking?": How women navigate experiences of HIV-related stigma in medical settings during pregnancy and birth. AU - Greene,Saara, AU - Ion,Allyson, AU - Kwaramba,Gladys, AU - Smith,Stephanie, AU - Loutfy,Mona R, Y1 - 2015/12/18/ PY - 2015/12/20/entrez PY - 2015/12/20/pubmed PY - 2017/1/10/medline KW - HIV KW - motherhood KW - perinatal care KW - pregnancy KW - stigma SP - 161 EP - 79 JF - Social work in health care JO - Soc Work Health Care VL - 55 IS - 2 N2 - Having children is a growing reality for women living with HIV in Canada. It is imperative to understand and respond to women's unique experiences and psychosocial challenges during pregnancy and as mothers including HIV-related stigma. This qualitative study used a narrative methodological approach to understand women's experiences of HIV-related stigma as they navigate health services in pregnancy (n = 66) and early postpartum (n = 64). Narratives of women living with HIV expose the spaces where stigmatizing practices emerge as women seek perinatal care and support, as well as highlight the relationship between HIV-related stigma and disclosure, and the impact this has on women's pregnancy and birthing experiences. SN - 1541-034X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26684355/"Why_are_you_pregnant_What_were_you_thinking":_How_women_navigate_experiences_of_HIV_related_stigma_in_medical_settings_during_pregnancy_and_birth_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00981389.2015.1081665 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -