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Implicit cognition about self-injury predicts actual self-injurious behavior: results from a longitudinal study of adolescents.
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2016 07; 57(7):805-13.JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The implicit association hypothesis of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) proposes that individuals who engage in self-injury develop, over time, strong associations between themselves and NSSI, and their identification with this behavior guides their future selection of NSSI to cope. Prior research has established a relationship between implicit NSSI associations (using an Implicit Association Test for Self-Injury) and engagement in NSSI. However, previous studies have been small and cross-sectional, and thus underpowered to examine the nature of this association and the extent to which implicit associations predict the persistence of NSSI.

METHODS

This study builds on previous research in a prospective, longitudinal examination of implicit self-identification with NSSI in a large sample of middle school students. NSSI behavior and implicit NSSI associations were assessed annually in school at three time points.

RESULTS

Adolescents who engaged in NSSI exhibited stronger implicit self-identification with NSSI than adolescents who did not engage in NSSI. Moreover, implicit NSSI identification was stronger among adolescents who engaged in cutting, frequent NSSI, and recent NSSI. A reciprocal association was observed between NSSI frequency and implicit NSSI identification over 1 year. Notably, implicit NSSI identification uniquely and prospectively predicted engagement in NSSI over the subsequent year.

CONCLUSIONS

Implicit self-identification with NSSI may track both trait- and state-related changes in the behavior and, importantly, may help predict continued engagement in NSSI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Clinical and Social Sciences in Psychology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA.Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA.Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26684880

Citation

Glenn, Catherine R., et al. "Implicit Cognition About Self-injury Predicts Actual Self-injurious Behavior: Results From a Longitudinal Study of Adolescents." Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, vol. 57, no. 7, 2016, pp. 805-13.
Glenn CR, Kleiman EM, Cha CB, et al. Implicit cognition about self-injury predicts actual self-injurious behavior: results from a longitudinal study of adolescents. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2016;57(7):805-13.
Glenn, C. R., Kleiman, E. M., Cha, C. B., Nock, M. K., & Prinstein, M. J. (2016). Implicit cognition about self-injury predicts actual self-injurious behavior: results from a longitudinal study of adolescents. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, 57(7), 805-13. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12500
Glenn CR, et al. Implicit Cognition About Self-injury Predicts Actual Self-injurious Behavior: Results From a Longitudinal Study of Adolescents. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2016;57(7):805-13. PubMed PMID: 26684880.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Implicit cognition about self-injury predicts actual self-injurious behavior: results from a longitudinal study of adolescents. AU - Glenn,Catherine R, AU - Kleiman,Evan M, AU - Cha,Christine B, AU - Nock,Matthew K, AU - Prinstein,Mitchell J, Y1 - 2015/12/18/ PY - 2015/11/02/accepted PY - 2015/12/20/entrez PY - 2015/12/20/pubmed PY - 2017/9/28/medline KW - Self-injury KW - adolescence KW - assessment KW - longitudinal studies KW - self-harm SP - 805 EP - 13 JF - Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines JO - J Child Psychol Psychiatry VL - 57 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: The implicit association hypothesis of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) proposes that individuals who engage in self-injury develop, over time, strong associations between themselves and NSSI, and their identification with this behavior guides their future selection of NSSI to cope. Prior research has established a relationship between implicit NSSI associations (using an Implicit Association Test for Self-Injury) and engagement in NSSI. However, previous studies have been small and cross-sectional, and thus underpowered to examine the nature of this association and the extent to which implicit associations predict the persistence of NSSI. METHODS: This study builds on previous research in a prospective, longitudinal examination of implicit self-identification with NSSI in a large sample of middle school students. NSSI behavior and implicit NSSI associations were assessed annually in school at three time points. RESULTS: Adolescents who engaged in NSSI exhibited stronger implicit self-identification with NSSI than adolescents who did not engage in NSSI. Moreover, implicit NSSI identification was stronger among adolescents who engaged in cutting, frequent NSSI, and recent NSSI. A reciprocal association was observed between NSSI frequency and implicit NSSI identification over 1 year. Notably, implicit NSSI identification uniquely and prospectively predicted engagement in NSSI over the subsequent year. CONCLUSIONS: Implicit self-identification with NSSI may track both trait- and state-related changes in the behavior and, importantly, may help predict continued engagement in NSSI. SN - 1469-7610 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26684880/Implicit_cognition_about_self_injury_predicts_actual_self_injurious_behavior:_results_from_a_longitudinal_study_of_adolescents_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12500 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -