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Keeping a target in memory does not increase the effect of the Müller-Lyer illusion on saccades.
Exp Brain Res. 2016 Apr; 234(4):977-83.EB

Abstract

The effects of visual contextual illusions on motor behaviour vary largely between experimental conditions. Whereas it has often been reported that the effects of illusions on pointing and grasping are largest when the movement is performed some time after the stimulus has disappeared, the effect of a delay has hardly been studied for saccadic eye movements. In this experiment, participants viewed a briefly presented Müller-Lyer illusion with a target at its endpoint and made a saccade to the remembered position of this target after a delay of 0, 0.6, 1.2 or 1.8 s. We found that horizontal saccade amplitudes were shorter for the perceptually shorter than for the perceptually longer configuration of the illusion. Most importantly, although the delay clearly affected saccade amplitude, resulting in shorter saccades for longer delays, the illusion effect did not depend on the duration of the delay. We argue that visually guided and memory-guided saccades are likely based on a common visual representation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Human Movement Sciences, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. a.debrouwer@queensu.ca. Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, Montessorilaan 3, 6525 HR, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. a.debrouwer@queensu.ca.Department of Human Movement Sciences, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Department of Human Movement Sciences, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26686530

Citation

de Brouwer, Anouk J., et al. "Keeping a Target in Memory Does Not Increase the Effect of the Müller-Lyer Illusion On Saccades." Experimental Brain Research, vol. 234, no. 4, 2016, pp. 977-83.
de Brouwer AJ, Brenner E, Smeets JB. Keeping a target in memory does not increase the effect of the Müller-Lyer illusion on saccades. Exp Brain Res. 2016;234(4):977-83.
de Brouwer, A. J., Brenner, E., & Smeets, J. B. (2016). Keeping a target in memory does not increase the effect of the Müller-Lyer illusion on saccades. Experimental Brain Research, 234(4), 977-83. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-015-4520-5
de Brouwer AJ, Brenner E, Smeets JB. Keeping a Target in Memory Does Not Increase the Effect of the Müller-Lyer Illusion On Saccades. Exp Brain Res. 2016;234(4):977-83. PubMed PMID: 26686530.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Keeping a target in memory does not increase the effect of the Müller-Lyer illusion on saccades. AU - de Brouwer,Anouk J, AU - Brenner,Eli, AU - Smeets,Jeroen B J, Y1 - 2015/12/21/ PY - 2015/08/05/received PY - 2015/11/30/accepted PY - 2015/12/22/entrez PY - 2015/12/22/pubmed PY - 2016/12/15/medline KW - Dorsal visual stream KW - Gaze KW - Variability KW - Ventral visual stream KW - Vision SP - 977 EP - 83 JF - Experimental brain research JO - Exp Brain Res VL - 234 IS - 4 N2 - The effects of visual contextual illusions on motor behaviour vary largely between experimental conditions. Whereas it has often been reported that the effects of illusions on pointing and grasping are largest when the movement is performed some time after the stimulus has disappeared, the effect of a delay has hardly been studied for saccadic eye movements. In this experiment, participants viewed a briefly presented Müller-Lyer illusion with a target at its endpoint and made a saccade to the remembered position of this target after a delay of 0, 0.6, 1.2 or 1.8 s. We found that horizontal saccade amplitudes were shorter for the perceptually shorter than for the perceptually longer configuration of the illusion. Most importantly, although the delay clearly affected saccade amplitude, resulting in shorter saccades for longer delays, the illusion effect did not depend on the duration of the delay. We argue that visually guided and memory-guided saccades are likely based on a common visual representation. SN - 1432-1106 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26686530/Keeping_a_target_in_memory_does_not_increase_the_effect_of_the_Müller_Lyer_illusion_on_saccades_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-015-4520-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -