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Coffee consumption and the risk of cutaneous melanoma: a meta-analysis.
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Jun; 55(4):1317-29.EJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

Results from epidemiologic studies on coffee consumption and the risk of cutaneous melanoma are inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the associations between the consumption of total coffee, caffeinated coffee and decaffeinated coffee and the risk of cutaneous melanoma, respectively.

METHODS

A literature search was performed in PubMed, Web of Science and EMBASE for relevant articles published up to August 2015. Pooled relative risks (RRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated with a random-effects model. Dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline.

RESULTS

Twelve studies involving 832,956 participants for total coffee consumption, 5 studies involving 717,151 participants for caffeinated coffee consumption and 6 studies involving 718,231 participants for decaffeinated coffee consumption were included in this meta-analysis. Compared with the lowest level of consumption, the pooled RRs were 0.80 (95 % CI 0.69-0.93, I (2) = 53.5 %), 0.85 (95 % CI 0.71-1.01, I (2) = 65.0 %) and 0.92 (95 % CI 0.81-1.05, I (2) = 0.0 %) for the consumption of total coffee, caffeinated coffee and decaffeinated coffee, respectively. In subgroup analysis by study design, the pooled RRs in cohort studies and case-control studies were 0.83 (95 % CI 0.72-0.97) and 0.74 (95 % CI 0.51-1.07) for total coffee consumption, respectively. Dose-response analysis suggested cutaneous melanoma risk decreased by 3 % [0.97 (0.93-1.00)] and 4 % [0.96 (0.92-1.01)] for 1 cup/day increment of total coffee and caffeinated coffee consumption, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

This meta-analysis suggests that coffee consumption may reduce the risk of cutaneous melanoma.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, The Medical College of Qingdao University, No. 38 Dengzhou Road, Qingdao, 266021, China.Department of Oncology, Second Affiliated Hospital, The Medical College of Qingdao University, Qingdao, China.Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, The Medical College of Qingdao University, No. 38 Dengzhou Road, Qingdao, 266021, China. zhangdf1961@126.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26695410

Citation

Wang, Jia, et al. "Coffee Consumption and the Risk of Cutaneous Melanoma: a Meta-analysis." European Journal of Nutrition, vol. 55, no. 4, 2016, pp. 1317-29.
Wang J, Li X, Zhang D. Coffee consumption and the risk of cutaneous melanoma: a meta-analysis. Eur J Nutr. 2016;55(4):1317-29.
Wang, J., Li, X., & Zhang, D. (2016). Coffee consumption and the risk of cutaneous melanoma: a meta-analysis. European Journal of Nutrition, 55(4), 1317-29. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-015-1139-z
Wang J, Li X, Zhang D. Coffee Consumption and the Risk of Cutaneous Melanoma: a Meta-analysis. Eur J Nutr. 2016;55(4):1317-29. PubMed PMID: 26695410.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coffee consumption and the risk of cutaneous melanoma: a meta-analysis. AU - Wang,Jia, AU - Li,Xutong, AU - Zhang,Dongfeng, Y1 - 2015/12/22/ PY - 2015/09/20/received PY - 2015/12/11/accepted PY - 2015/12/24/entrez PY - 2015/12/24/pubmed PY - 2017/4/4/medline KW - Caffeinated coffee KW - Coffee KW - Cutaneous melanoma KW - Meta-analysis SP - 1317 EP - 29 JF - European journal of nutrition JO - Eur J Nutr VL - 55 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE: Results from epidemiologic studies on coffee consumption and the risk of cutaneous melanoma are inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the associations between the consumption of total coffee, caffeinated coffee and decaffeinated coffee and the risk of cutaneous melanoma, respectively. METHODS: A literature search was performed in PubMed, Web of Science and EMBASE for relevant articles published up to August 2015. Pooled relative risks (RRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated with a random-effects model. Dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline. RESULTS: Twelve studies involving 832,956 participants for total coffee consumption, 5 studies involving 717,151 participants for caffeinated coffee consumption and 6 studies involving 718,231 participants for decaffeinated coffee consumption were included in this meta-analysis. Compared with the lowest level of consumption, the pooled RRs were 0.80 (95 % CI 0.69-0.93, I (2) = 53.5 %), 0.85 (95 % CI 0.71-1.01, I (2) = 65.0 %) and 0.92 (95 % CI 0.81-1.05, I (2) = 0.0 %) for the consumption of total coffee, caffeinated coffee and decaffeinated coffee, respectively. In subgroup analysis by study design, the pooled RRs in cohort studies and case-control studies were 0.83 (95 % CI 0.72-0.97) and 0.74 (95 % CI 0.51-1.07) for total coffee consumption, respectively. Dose-response analysis suggested cutaneous melanoma risk decreased by 3 % [0.97 (0.93-1.00)] and 4 % [0.96 (0.92-1.01)] for 1 cup/day increment of total coffee and caffeinated coffee consumption, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis suggests that coffee consumption may reduce the risk of cutaneous melanoma. SN - 1436-6215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26695410/Coffee_consumption_and_the_risk_of_cutaneous_melanoma:_a_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-015-1139-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -