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Weight perceptions, disordered eating behaviors, and emotional self-efficacy among high school adolescents.
Eat Behav 2016; 21:1-6EB

Abstract

Although emotional disorders and disordered eating behaviors are known to be related, the relationship between emotional self-efficacy (ESE) and disordered eating is unknown. This study examined the relationship between ESE and disordered eating in a statewide sample of public high school adolescents (n=2566). The Centers for Disease Control Youth Risk Behavior Survey and an adolescent ESE scale were utilized. Logistic regression adjusted for key covariates explored the relationship between low ESE and disordered eating among selected race and gender groups. Self-perceived weight as underweight or overweight; and dieting, vomiting or taking laxatives, taking diet pills, and fasting to lose weight were each associated (p<.05) with lower levels of ESE for certain race/gender groups. Findings provide increased justification for tailoring disordered eating interventions and treatments to accommodate the highest risk groups. Measures of ESE should be considered for adolescent mental health assessments in fieldwork, research, and evaluation efforts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, School of Public Health, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9190, United States. Electronic address: kzullig@hsc.wvu.edu.Texas Obesity Research Center, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77004, United States.Department of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, United States.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26697720

Citation

Zullig, Keith J., et al. "Weight Perceptions, Disordered Eating Behaviors, and Emotional Self-efficacy Among High School Adolescents." Eating Behaviors, vol. 21, 2016, pp. 1-6.
Zullig KJ, Matthews-Ewald MR, Valois RF. Weight perceptions, disordered eating behaviors, and emotional self-efficacy among high school adolescents. Eat Behav. 2016;21:1-6.
Zullig, K. J., Matthews-Ewald, M. R., & Valois, R. F. (2016). Weight perceptions, disordered eating behaviors, and emotional self-efficacy among high school adolescents. Eating Behaviors, 21, pp. 1-6. doi:10.1016/j.eatbeh.2015.11.007.
Zullig KJ, Matthews-Ewald MR, Valois RF. Weight Perceptions, Disordered Eating Behaviors, and Emotional Self-efficacy Among High School Adolescents. Eat Behav. 2016;21:1-6. PubMed PMID: 26697720.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Weight perceptions, disordered eating behaviors, and emotional self-efficacy among high school adolescents. AU - Zullig,Keith J, AU - Matthews-Ewald,Molly R, AU - Valois,Robert F, Y1 - 2015/11/17/ PY - 2015/04/23/received PY - 2015/08/27/revised PY - 2015/11/11/accepted PY - 2015/12/25/entrez PY - 2015/12/25/pubmed PY - 2017/2/7/medline KW - Adolescents KW - Eating disorders KW - Emotional aspects KW - Gender differences KW - Self-efficacy SP - 1 EP - 6 JF - Eating behaviors JO - Eat Behav VL - 21 N2 - Although emotional disorders and disordered eating behaviors are known to be related, the relationship between emotional self-efficacy (ESE) and disordered eating is unknown. This study examined the relationship between ESE and disordered eating in a statewide sample of public high school adolescents (n=2566). The Centers for Disease Control Youth Risk Behavior Survey and an adolescent ESE scale were utilized. Logistic regression adjusted for key covariates explored the relationship between low ESE and disordered eating among selected race and gender groups. Self-perceived weight as underweight or overweight; and dieting, vomiting or taking laxatives, taking diet pills, and fasting to lose weight were each associated (p<.05) with lower levels of ESE for certain race/gender groups. Findings provide increased justification for tailoring disordered eating interventions and treatments to accommodate the highest risk groups. Measures of ESE should be considered for adolescent mental health assessments in fieldwork, research, and evaluation efforts. SN - 1873-7358 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26697720/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1471-0153(15)30020-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -