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Malassezia species in healthy skin and in dermatological conditions.
Int J Dermatol. 2016 May; 55(5):494-504.IJ

Abstract

The genus Malassezia comprises lipophilic species, the natural habitat of which is the skin of humans and other warm-blooded animals. However, these species have been associated with a diversity of dermatological disorders and even systemic infections. Pityriasis versicolor is the only cutaneous disease etiologically connected to Malassezia yeasts. In the other dermatoses, such as Malassezia folliculitis, seborrheic dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis, these yeasts have been suggested to play pathogenic roles either as direct agents of infection or as trigger factors because there is no evidence that the organisms invade the skin. Malassezia yeasts have been classified into at least 14 species, of which eight have been isolated from human skin, including Malassezia furfur, Malassezia pachydermatis, Malassezia sympodialis, Malassezia slooffiae, Malassezia globosa, Malassezia obtusa, Malassezia restricta, Malassezia dermatis, Malassezia japonica, and Malassezia yamatoensis. Distributions of Malassezia species in the healthy body and in skin diseases have been investigated using culture-based and molecular techniques, and variable results have been reported from different geographical regions. This article reviews and discusses the latest available data on the pathogenicity of Malassezia spp., their distributions in dermatological conditions and in healthy skin, discrepancies in the two methods of identification, and the susceptibility of Malassezia spp. to antifungals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatovenereology, University Clinical Center of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina.Department of Dermatovenereology, University Clinical Center of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina.Department of Dermatovenereology, University Clinical Center of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina.Institute of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26710919

Citation

Prohic, Asja, et al. "Malassezia Species in Healthy Skin and in Dermatological Conditions." International Journal of Dermatology, vol. 55, no. 5, 2016, pp. 494-504.
Prohic A, Jovovic Sadikovic T, Krupalija-Fazlic M, et al. Malassezia species in healthy skin and in dermatological conditions. Int J Dermatol. 2016;55(5):494-504.
Prohic, A., Jovovic Sadikovic, T., Krupalija-Fazlic, M., & Kuskunovic-Vlahovljak, S. (2016). Malassezia species in healthy skin and in dermatological conditions. International Journal of Dermatology, 55(5), 494-504. https://doi.org/10.1111/ijd.13116
Prohic A, et al. Malassezia Species in Healthy Skin and in Dermatological Conditions. Int J Dermatol. 2016;55(5):494-504. PubMed PMID: 26710919.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Malassezia species in healthy skin and in dermatological conditions. AU - Prohic,Asja, AU - Jovovic Sadikovic,Tamara, AU - Krupalija-Fazlic,Mersiha, AU - Kuskunovic-Vlahovljak,Suada, Y1 - 2015/12/29/ PY - 2015/01/08/received PY - 2015/03/17/revised PY - 2015/06/09/accepted PY - 2015/12/30/entrez PY - 2015/12/30/pubmed PY - 2017/1/12/medline SP - 494 EP - 504 JF - International journal of dermatology JO - Int. J. Dermatol. VL - 55 IS - 5 N2 - The genus Malassezia comprises lipophilic species, the natural habitat of which is the skin of humans and other warm-blooded animals. However, these species have been associated with a diversity of dermatological disorders and even systemic infections. Pityriasis versicolor is the only cutaneous disease etiologically connected to Malassezia yeasts. In the other dermatoses, such as Malassezia folliculitis, seborrheic dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis, these yeasts have been suggested to play pathogenic roles either as direct agents of infection or as trigger factors because there is no evidence that the organisms invade the skin. Malassezia yeasts have been classified into at least 14 species, of which eight have been isolated from human skin, including Malassezia furfur, Malassezia pachydermatis, Malassezia sympodialis, Malassezia slooffiae, Malassezia globosa, Malassezia obtusa, Malassezia restricta, Malassezia dermatis, Malassezia japonica, and Malassezia yamatoensis. Distributions of Malassezia species in the healthy body and in skin diseases have been investigated using culture-based and molecular techniques, and variable results have been reported from different geographical regions. This article reviews and discusses the latest available data on the pathogenicity of Malassezia spp., their distributions in dermatological conditions and in healthy skin, discrepancies in the two methods of identification, and the susceptibility of Malassezia spp. to antifungals. SN - 1365-4632 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26710919/Malassezia_species_in_healthy_skin_and_in_dermatological_conditions_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/ijd.13116 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -