Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Doppler ultrasound evaluation for lower extremity deep venous thrombosis in a community hospital.
N C Med J. 1989 Aug; 50(8):457-60.NC

Abstract

The accuracy of Doppler examination for lower extremity deep venous thrombosis in a community hospital vascular laboratory was determined by comparing the Doppler results with venograms of 97 limbs in 90 patients. There were 47 limbs with a normal Doppler study, 46 abnormal (consistent with deep venous thrombosis) and 4 with an equivocal study. The overall accuracy was 95%. Both the sensitivity and specificity were 94% when equivocal studies were considered abnormal. Based on these results, we recommend venography or repeat Doppler examination for patients with a normal Doppler study only if the clinical findings are strongly suggestive of deep venous thrombosis. Patients with an abnormal Doppler examination and clinical findings consistent with deep venous thrombosis can be treated for deep venous thrombosis, with a high degree of confidence in the diagnosis, without venography. Patients with equivocal Doppler examinations are advised to have a venogram. While our results are equal to the best reports from research-oriented university vascular laboratories it should not be assumed that they can be readily reproduced in other settings. The technologists performing these studies should be highly skilled, experienced and preferably board certified. Internal quality control of any testing facility is necessary to assure accurate and reliable Doppler ultrasonic results prior to recommending treatment of deep venous thrombosis based on Doppler ultrasound without venography.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2671755

Citation

Archie, J P., et al. "Doppler Ultrasound Evaluation for Lower Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis in a Community Hospital." North Carolina Medical Journal, vol. 50, no. 8, 1989, pp. 457-60.
Archie JP, McDaniel DN, Dean VH, et al. Doppler ultrasound evaluation for lower extremity deep venous thrombosis in a community hospital. N C Med J. 1989;50(8):457-60.
Archie, J. P., McDaniel, D. N., Dean, V. H., Jester, J. E., & Hall, D. C. (1989). Doppler ultrasound evaluation for lower extremity deep venous thrombosis in a community hospital. North Carolina Medical Journal, 50(8), 457-60.
Archie JP, et al. Doppler Ultrasound Evaluation for Lower Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis in a Community Hospital. N C Med J. 1989;50(8):457-60. PubMed PMID: 2671755.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Doppler ultrasound evaluation for lower extremity deep venous thrombosis in a community hospital. AU - Archie,J P,Jr AU - McDaniel,D N, AU - Dean,V H, AU - Jester,J E, AU - Hall,D C, PY - 1989/8/1/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1989/8/1/entrez SP - 457 EP - 60 JF - North Carolina medical journal JO - N C Med J VL - 50 IS - 8 N2 - The accuracy of Doppler examination for lower extremity deep venous thrombosis in a community hospital vascular laboratory was determined by comparing the Doppler results with venograms of 97 limbs in 90 patients. There were 47 limbs with a normal Doppler study, 46 abnormal (consistent with deep venous thrombosis) and 4 with an equivocal study. The overall accuracy was 95%. Both the sensitivity and specificity were 94% when equivocal studies were considered abnormal. Based on these results, we recommend venography or repeat Doppler examination for patients with a normal Doppler study only if the clinical findings are strongly suggestive of deep venous thrombosis. Patients with an abnormal Doppler examination and clinical findings consistent with deep venous thrombosis can be treated for deep venous thrombosis, with a high degree of confidence in the diagnosis, without venography. Patients with equivocal Doppler examinations are advised to have a venogram. While our results are equal to the best reports from research-oriented university vascular laboratories it should not be assumed that they can be readily reproduced in other settings. The technologists performing these studies should be highly skilled, experienced and preferably board certified. Internal quality control of any testing facility is necessary to assure accurate and reliable Doppler ultrasonic results prior to recommending treatment of deep venous thrombosis based on Doppler ultrasound without venography. SN - 0029-2559 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2671755/Doppler_ultrasound_evaluation_for_lower_extremity_deep_venous_thrombosis_in_a_community_hospital_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.