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Review of 3-Dimensional Printing on Cranial Neurosurgery Simulation Training.
World Neurosurg 2016; 88:188-98WN

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Shorter working times, reduced operative exposure to complex procedures, and increased subspecialization have resulted in training constraints within most surgical fields. Simulation has been suggested as a possible means of acquiring new surgical skills without exposing patients to the surgeon's operative "learning curve." Here we review the potential impact of 3-dimensional printing on simulation and training within cranial neurosurgery and its implications for the future.

METHODS

In accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines, a comprehensive search of PubMed, OVID MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was performed.

RESULTS

In total, 31 studies relating to the use of 3-dimensional (3D) printing within neurosurgery, of which 16 were specifically related to simulation and training, were identified. The main impact of 3D printing on neurosurgical simulation training was within vascular surgery, where patient-specific replication of vascular anatomy and pathologies can aid surgeons in operative planning and clip placement for reconstruction of vascular anatomy. Models containing replicas of brain tumors have also been reconstructed and used for training purposes, with some providing realistic representations of skin, subcutaneous tissue, bone, dura, normal brain, and tumor tissue.

CONCLUSION

3D printing provides a unique means of directly replicating patient-specific pathologies. It can identify anatomic variation and provide a medium in which training models can be generated rapidly, allowing the trainee and experienced neurosurgeon to practice parts of operations preoperatively. Future studies are required to validate this technology in comparison with current simulators and show improved patient outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurosurgery, Royal London Hospital, Whitechapel, United Kingdom. Electronic address: v.n.vakharia@doctors.org.uk.Department of Neurosurgery, Royal London Hospital, Whitechapel, United Kingdom.Department of Neurosurgery, Royal London Hospital, Whitechapel, United Kingdom.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26724615

Citation

Vakharia, Vejay N., et al. "Review of 3-Dimensional Printing On Cranial Neurosurgery Simulation Training." World Neurosurgery, vol. 88, 2016, pp. 188-98.
Vakharia VN, Vakharia NN, Hill CS. Review of 3-Dimensional Printing on Cranial Neurosurgery Simulation Training. World Neurosurg. 2016;88:188-98.
Vakharia, V. N., Vakharia, N. N., & Hill, C. S. (2016). Review of 3-Dimensional Printing on Cranial Neurosurgery Simulation Training. World Neurosurgery, 88, pp. 188-98. doi:10.1016/j.wneu.2015.12.031.
Vakharia VN, Vakharia NN, Hill CS. Review of 3-Dimensional Printing On Cranial Neurosurgery Simulation Training. World Neurosurg. 2016;88:188-98. PubMed PMID: 26724615.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Review of 3-Dimensional Printing on Cranial Neurosurgery Simulation Training. AU - Vakharia,Vejay N, AU - Vakharia,Nilesh N, AU - Hill,Ciaran S, Y1 - 2015/12/25/ PY - 2015/08/25/received PY - 2015/12/07/revised PY - 2015/12/08/accepted PY - 2016/1/3/entrez PY - 2016/1/3/pubmed PY - 2016/8/25/medline KW - 3-Dimensional printing KW - Education KW - Neurosurgery KW - Simulation KW - Training SP - 188 EP - 98 JF - World neurosurgery JO - World Neurosurg VL - 88 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Shorter working times, reduced operative exposure to complex procedures, and increased subspecialization have resulted in training constraints within most surgical fields. Simulation has been suggested as a possible means of acquiring new surgical skills without exposing patients to the surgeon's operative "learning curve." Here we review the potential impact of 3-dimensional printing on simulation and training within cranial neurosurgery and its implications for the future. METHODS: In accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines, a comprehensive search of PubMed, OVID MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was performed. RESULTS: In total, 31 studies relating to the use of 3-dimensional (3D) printing within neurosurgery, of which 16 were specifically related to simulation and training, were identified. The main impact of 3D printing on neurosurgical simulation training was within vascular surgery, where patient-specific replication of vascular anatomy and pathologies can aid surgeons in operative planning and clip placement for reconstruction of vascular anatomy. Models containing replicas of brain tumors have also been reconstructed and used for training purposes, with some providing realistic representations of skin, subcutaneous tissue, bone, dura, normal brain, and tumor tissue. CONCLUSION: 3D printing provides a unique means of directly replicating patient-specific pathologies. It can identify anatomic variation and provide a medium in which training models can be generated rapidly, allowing the trainee and experienced neurosurgeon to practice parts of operations preoperatively. Future studies are required to validate this technology in comparison with current simulators and show improved patient outcomes. SN - 1878-8769 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26724615/Review_of_3_Dimensional_Printing_on_Cranial_Neurosurgery_Simulation_Training_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1878-8750(15)01735-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -