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Intravesical migration of an intrauterine device.
BMC Res Notes. 2016 Jan 02; 9:4.BR

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Intrauterine contraceptive device is the most common method of reversible contraception in women. The intrauterine contraceptive device can perforate the uterus and can also migrate into pelvic or abdominal organs. Perforation of the urinary bladder by an intrauterine contraceptive device is not common. In West Africa, intravesical migration of an intrauterine contraceptive device has been rarely reported. In this report, we present a case of an intrauterine contraceptive device migration into the urinary bladder of a 33 year old African woman at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana.

CASE REPORT

A 33 year old African woman presented with persistent urinary tract infection of 7 months duration despite appropriate antibiotic treatments. An abdominal ultrasonography revealed a urinary bladder calculus which was found to be an intrauterine contraceptive device on removal at cystoscopy. She got pregnant whilst having the intrauterine contraceptive device in place and delivered at term.

CONCLUSION

The presence of recurrent or persistent urinary tract infection in any woman with an intrauterine contraceptive device should raise the suspicion of intravesical migration of the intrauterine contraceptive device.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, School of Medical Sciences, KNUST, Kumasi, Ghana. gaysek@yahoo.com.Department of Surgery, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana. kwamemaison@yahoo.co.uk.Department of Obstetrics and Gyneacology, School of Medical Sciences, KNUST, Kumasi, Ghana. eskmorhe@yahoo.com.Department of Surgery, School of Medical Sciences, KNUST, Kumasi, Ghana. surgksi@yahoo.com.Department of Surgery, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana. addaiarhin@yahoo.com.Department of Surgery, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana. azor72@yahoo.com.Department of Surgery, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana. knyamekyedr@yahoo.com.Department of Surgery, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana. kuuku01@yahoo.com.Department of Surgery, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana. lionamoah1@yahoo.com.Department of Surgery, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana. antwi.isaac@gmail.com.Department of Surgery, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana. lordtonkas@yahoo.co.uk.Department of Surgery, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana. dagarthur@yahoo.com.

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26724805

Citation

Gyasi-Sarpong, Christian Kofi, et al. "Intravesical Migration of an Intrauterine Device." BMC Research Notes, vol. 9, 2016, p. 4.
Gyasi-Sarpong CK, Maison PO, Morhe E, et al. Intravesical migration of an intrauterine device. BMC Res Notes. 2016;9:4.
Gyasi-Sarpong, C. K., Maison, P. O., Morhe, E., Aboah, K., Appiah, K. A., Azorliade, R., Baah-Nyamekye, K., Otu-Boateng, K., Amoah, G., Antwi, I., Frimpong-Twumasi, B., & Arthur, D. (2016). Intravesical migration of an intrauterine device. BMC Research Notes, 9, 4. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13104-015-1792-6
Gyasi-Sarpong CK, et al. Intravesical Migration of an Intrauterine Device. BMC Res Notes. 2016 Jan 2;9:4. PubMed PMID: 26724805.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intravesical migration of an intrauterine device. AU - Gyasi-Sarpong,Christian Kofi, AU - Maison,Patrick Opoku Manu, AU - Morhe,Emmanuel, AU - Aboah,Ken, AU - Appiah,Kwaku Addai-Arhin, AU - Azorliade,Roland, AU - Baah-Nyamekye,Kofi, AU - Otu-Boateng,Kwaku, AU - Amoah,George, AU - Antwi,Isaac, AU - Frimpong-Twumasi,Benjamin, AU - Arthur,Douglas, Y1 - 2016/01/02/ PY - 2015/06/07/received PY - 2015/12/07/accepted PY - 2016/1/4/entrez PY - 2016/1/5/pubmed PY - 2016/10/1/medline SP - 4 EP - 4 JF - BMC research notes JO - BMC Res Notes VL - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Intrauterine contraceptive device is the most common method of reversible contraception in women. The intrauterine contraceptive device can perforate the uterus and can also migrate into pelvic or abdominal organs. Perforation of the urinary bladder by an intrauterine contraceptive device is not common. In West Africa, intravesical migration of an intrauterine contraceptive device has been rarely reported. In this report, we present a case of an intrauterine contraceptive device migration into the urinary bladder of a 33 year old African woman at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana. CASE REPORT: A 33 year old African woman presented with persistent urinary tract infection of 7 months duration despite appropriate antibiotic treatments. An abdominal ultrasonography revealed a urinary bladder calculus which was found to be an intrauterine contraceptive device on removal at cystoscopy. She got pregnant whilst having the intrauterine contraceptive device in place and delivered at term. CONCLUSION: The presence of recurrent or persistent urinary tract infection in any woman with an intrauterine contraceptive device should raise the suspicion of intravesical migration of the intrauterine contraceptive device. SN - 1756-0500 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26724805/Intravesical_migration_of_an_intrauterine_device_ L2 - https://bmcresnotes.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13104-015-1792-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -