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Gender-specific association between metabolic syndrome and decreased glomerular filtration rate in elderly population.
Int Urol Nephrol. 2016 Mar; 48(3):389-97.IU

Abstract

PURPOSE

Few studies have investigated the association between metabolic syndrome (MS) and chronic kidney disease in the elderly. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to examine the sex-specific association between MS and decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in a Chinese elderly population.

METHODS

We performed cross-sectional analyses of older (age ≥60 years) males (n = 19,015) and females (n = 23,310) classified as 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 component(s) or MS group based on the presenting MS component(s). Sex-specific relationship of decreased GFR with MS component(s) was analyzed by logistic regression models.

RESULTS

Compared with participants with 0 component of MS, males with 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 component(s) had 1.40-, 1.79-, 2.41-, 3.29-, and 4.09-fold risks for decreased GFR; females with 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 component(s) had 1.65-, 1.71-, 1.88-, 2.32-, and 1.96-fold risks for decreased GFR, respectively. The multivariate-adjusted odds ratios for decreased GFR in males and females with MS compared with those without MS were 1.79 and 1.25, respectively. For participants without hypertension and diabetes, the association of MS with decreased GFR was still significant.

CONCLUSIONS

In this study of 42,325 Chinese participants aged ≥60 years, MS was significantly associated with decreased GFR, and the association was more profound for males than females.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cardiology, The Third Xiang-Ya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China.Center of Clinical Pharmacology, The Third Xiang-Ya Hospital, Central South University, 138 Tong-Zi-Po Road, 410013, Changsha, Hunan, People's Republic of China.School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevada, Reno, NV, USA.Center of Clinical Pharmacology, The Third Xiang-Ya Hospital, Central South University, 138 Tong-Zi-Po Road, 410013, Changsha, Hunan, People's Republic of China.School of Pharmacy, Central South University, Changsha, China.Department of Cardiology, The Third Xiang-Ya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China.Center of Clinical Pharmacology, The Third Xiang-Ya Hospital, Central South University, 138 Tong-Zi-Po Road, 410013, Changsha, Hunan, People's Republic of China.Center of Clinical Pharmacology, The Third Xiang-Ya Hospital, Central South University, 138 Tong-Zi-Po Road, 410013, Changsha, Hunan, People's Republic of China.The Pediatric Heart Center, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, 2 An-Zhen Road, 100029, Beijing, People's Republic of China. ping.zhang@hotmail.com.Center of Clinical Pharmacology, The Third Xiang-Ya Hospital, Central South University, 138 Tong-Zi-Po Road, 410013, Changsha, Hunan, People's Republic of China. yhxy3yy@126.com.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26725076

Citation

Wen, Jia, et al. "Gender-specific Association Between Metabolic Syndrome and Decreased Glomerular Filtration Rate in Elderly Population." International Urology and Nephrology, vol. 48, no. 3, 2016, pp. 389-97.
Wen J, Guo CX, Lu MG, et al. Gender-specific association between metabolic syndrome and decreased glomerular filtration rate in elderly population. Int Urol Nephrol. 2016;48(3):389-97.
Wen, J., Guo, C. X., Lu, M. G., Lu, Y., Huang, Y., Liu, X., Li, Y., Huang, Z. J., Zhang, Y. P., & Yuan, H. (2016). Gender-specific association between metabolic syndrome and decreased glomerular filtration rate in elderly population. International Urology and Nephrology, 48(3), 389-97. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11255-015-1172-0
Wen J, et al. Gender-specific Association Between Metabolic Syndrome and Decreased Glomerular Filtration Rate in Elderly Population. Int Urol Nephrol. 2016;48(3):389-97. PubMed PMID: 26725076.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gender-specific association between metabolic syndrome and decreased glomerular filtration rate in elderly population. AU - Wen,Jia, AU - Guo,Chen-Xian, AU - Lu,Ming-Gen, AU - Lu,Yao, AU - Huang,Yun, AU - Liu,Xing, AU - Li,Ying, AU - Huang,Zhi-Jun, AU - Zhang,Ya-Ping, AU - Yuan,Hong, Y1 - 2016/01/02/ PY - 2015/09/14/received PY - 2015/11/21/accepted PY - 2016/1/4/entrez PY - 2016/1/5/pubmed PY - 2016/12/21/medline KW - Chronic kidney disease KW - Decreased glomerular filtration rate KW - Elderly KW - Metabolic syndrome SP - 389 EP - 97 JF - International urology and nephrology JO - Int Urol Nephrol VL - 48 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE: Few studies have investigated the association between metabolic syndrome (MS) and chronic kidney disease in the elderly. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to examine the sex-specific association between MS and decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in a Chinese elderly population. METHODS: We performed cross-sectional analyses of older (age ≥60 years) males (n = 19,015) and females (n = 23,310) classified as 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 component(s) or MS group based on the presenting MS component(s). Sex-specific relationship of decreased GFR with MS component(s) was analyzed by logistic regression models. RESULTS: Compared with participants with 0 component of MS, males with 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 component(s) had 1.40-, 1.79-, 2.41-, 3.29-, and 4.09-fold risks for decreased GFR; females with 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 component(s) had 1.65-, 1.71-, 1.88-, 2.32-, and 1.96-fold risks for decreased GFR, respectively. The multivariate-adjusted odds ratios for decreased GFR in males and females with MS compared with those without MS were 1.79 and 1.25, respectively. For participants without hypertension and diabetes, the association of MS with decreased GFR was still significant. CONCLUSIONS: In this study of 42,325 Chinese participants aged ≥60 years, MS was significantly associated with decreased GFR, and the association was more profound for males than females. SN - 1573-2584 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26725076/Gender_specific_association_between_metabolic_syndrome_and_decreased_glomerular_filtration_rate_in_elderly_population_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s11255-015-1172-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -